Thursday, August 24, 2006

Net points

Posted By on Thu, Aug 24, 2006 at 1:50 PM

Feel like Comcast has you hamstrung with 100 feet of black cord, limited selection and/or customer service and ever-escalating rates? If so, you might want to chime in with support for telecom reform bill HR5252. The bill, which passed the House 321 to 101 and is currently awaiting consideration by the Senate, would open local markets to multiple providers of cable, video and phone services. For Nashville, which sold its soul to Comcast nee Viacom decades ago, HR5252 could ultimately mean more channels, lower bills, shorter hold times when you get a blue screen, who knows.... Congressman Jim Cooper voted in favor of the bill, but with reservations regarding the concept of Network Neutrality. (Pay attention, here's where it gets interesting...) If included in the legislation, so-called Net Neutrality provisions would ensure equal speed of access for all content providers so the Internet doesn't become controlled by the dot-coms that can pay for better, faster access. In other words, the law needs to protect the little guys (e.g., Pith readers like you, maybe?) from getting relegated to the slow lanes of the Info Highway.
To learn more about the bill, check out wewantchoice.com which presents the case for HR5252, and savetheinternet.com and a video at YouTube, which present the potentially dark side of the bill without adequate language to protect Net Neutrality.

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