Weekend Updates 

Distribute your own movie, like Thong Girl and Fellini

Distribute your own movie, like Thong Girl and Fellini

Want to learn how to distribute your own movie without exhibitors and home-video execs treating you as their cellblock bitch? You need the FilmNashville Film/TV/DVD Distribution Symposium Saturday at the Watkins Film School. The symposium addresses all phases of film distribution and related issues such as merchandising, licensing, clearing music rights, and domestic and foreign markets. Speakers include Jeff Calman, senior VP of Warner Bros. Home Video/DVD, Pay-Per-View, and Video On Demand; John Cherry, director of the lucrative Ernest franchise; Mitchell Galin, producer of the Sci-Fi Channel's Dune and other miniseries; and Randy Naft, CEO of production company/distributor Liberty International.

The event begins 9:30 a.m. at 2298 MetroCenter Blvd. The symposium is almost full, but a few seats remain. For more information, see www.filmnashville.com or e-mail filmnashville@filmnashville.com.

♦ You've got another thong coming: After making a splash at the recent Nashville HorrorCon, hometown superhero Thong Girl takes another crack at evildoers in her second adventure, to be broadcast as part of the Stubby's Place comedy show 11 p.m. Friday on CATV Ch. 19. The title is "Thong Girl 2: The Return of the Thong," and word has it Thong Girl's geeky love interest is (or should we say, was) actually a respected Scene columnist. We couldn't be prouder. See www.stubbytv.com for more info.

The event begins 9:30 a.m. at 2298 MetroCenter Blvd. The symposium is almost full, but a few seats remain. For more information, see www.filmnashville.com or e-mail filmnashville@filmnashville.com.

♦ Paul Young, head of the film studies department at Vanderbilt, will introduce the 8 p.m. screening Friday of Federico Fellini's 1960 masterpiece La Dolce Vita at the Belcourt. The film, which stars Marcello Mastroianni as a soul-sick journalist navigating the empty debauchery of Rome's jet set, opens this weekend at the Belcourt in a stunning new print. Young will not appear in a thong, but he's well worth seeing anyway. Call 846-3150 for more information.

♦ Paul Young, head of the film studies department at Vanderbilt, will introduce the 8 p.m. screening Friday of Federico Fellini's 1960 masterpiece La Dolce Vita at the Belcourt. The film, which stars Marcello Mastroianni as a soul-sick journalist navigating the empty debauchery of Rome's jet set, opens this weekend at the Belcourt in a stunning new print. Young will not appear in a thong, but he's well worth seeing anyway. Call 846-3150 for more information.

♦ Other cool Belcourt activities this week: At 5:30 p.m. Monday, two classic hand-related episodes of the cult TV favorite Mystery Science Theater 3000 screen in a benefit for the non-profit volunteer organization Hands On Nashville (geddit?). The no-budget oddity Manos, the Hands of Fate (a.k.a. "Hands, the Hands of Fate") may be the single funniest episode in the series' history, and follow-up The Crawling Eye is nearly as good. A reception will feature Mexican beer and food from Qdoba.

On Tuesday, the theater will host the local premiere of Playing Clandestine, a romantic drama by filmmakers Shannon Christian and Jessica Childs. The film, which stars April Hardcastle and Josh Lagersen, concerns the sexual and romantic entanglements of a group of friends, starting with a party where a game of "Truth or Dare" stirs secret passions. Proceeds benefit the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN). Call 846-3150 or see www.belcourt.org for more information.

♦ Four outstanding local singer-songwriters and an assortment of their sympathetic friends appear together at Thursday's Music for Change at The Basement, with the proceeds benefiting the Democratic National Committee and John Kerry's presidential campaign. Headlining are Carter Little (with his evocatively sketchy neo-folk), Clare Burson (purveyor of gently insistent mood-pop), The Kyle Andrews Fun Team (a smart, adventurous indie ensemble) and Sarah Siskind (a modernist roots musician with a poetic flair), with special appearances by the likes of Carter Wood, Jeff Coffin and Brother Henry, among others. It should be a night of righteous stumping and progressive Americana.

♦ For loyal opposition, the documentary Celsius 41.11 ("the temperature at which the brain begins to die") quietly snuck into Carmike's Thoroughbred 20 this weekend. Don't know why it has taken so long for a Republican counter to Fahrenheit 9/11 to emerge, but Kevin Knoblock's film answers Michael Moore with commentators Charles Krauthammer, Fred Dalton Thompson, Michael Medved and others, who make the case for four more years of Bush (hint: it involves Israel). Advance word is either ecstatic (if you're voting for Bush) or abysmal (if you're voting for Kerry). In the absence of the doc Michael Moore Hates America, which is reportedly pretty good, you might just split the difference and see Team America: World Police.

—Jim Ridley and Noel Murray

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