Weekend Updates 

Signals, wolves and Red Grooms face off with Guided by Voices, blind samurai and Sergio Leone in an eventful week

Signals, wolves and Red Grooms face off with Guided by Voices, blind samurai and Sergio Leone in an eventful week

More good news for the folks at Radio Free Nashville, who are one step nearing to getting on the air this fall. Thanks to the Metro Board of Zoning Appeals, the low-power FM station will be permitted to construct a tower and station building on its property in Pasquo near Bellevue. The land won't be ready for another two months, but the proposed community radio station is busy trying to raise needed funds in preparation.

To that end, RFN is hosting a benefit at The Sutler 6:30 p.m. Friday. The featured performer is Nashville Scene Music Awards nominee Johnny Jones, one of the city's premier blues guitarists and a part of Nashville's vibrant 1960s R&B heyday. He'll be joined by "urban folk" trio Muldoon Felton Goold and string band Ten Mile Drive. For more information on the station, go to www.radiofreenashville.org.

♦ As the city's kids return to school, enjoy a couple of late-summer outings this weekend for the family. Saturday marks the last performance for the Olde Worlde Theatre Company's held-over production of Little Red Riding Hood at the Belcourt, which has been packing the house. The show starts at 10 a.m., and tickets are $5 per child, which includes one free adult admission.

Then, on Sunday, round up the tots for Red Grooms Family Day at the Frist Center. Set to coincide with the museum's current retrospective of the native Nashville artist, the afternoon offers a variety of activities that will let children capture some of the boundless energy of the Grooms exhibit. Kids can help sculpt their own carousel figures in honor of Grooms' Tennessee Fox Trot Carousel or produce their own relief prints. The event is free and open to the public starting at 1 p.m.

♦ This just in: Guided by Voices has been booked as the surprise guest at Wednesday's Uptown Mix at the corner of 20th and Division. Drink as much as GBV frontman Bob Pollard and win a prize! Or a ticket for public intoxication.

♦ In honor of Open Water this weekend, Regal Cinemas tosses some arthouse chum into the churning waters of its Green Hills shark tank. Takeshi Kitano's The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi slices up the competition with one of the Japanese actor-filmmaker's most playful films: a rollicking samurai western based on the cult hero of the title. Zach Braff's dark romantic comedy Garden State emerges in wide release, while the ghost of Cary Grant (played by Kyle MacLachlan) haunts the gay farce Touch of Pink.

Still, the Belcourt has the week's big catches. Essential viewing for anyone whose blood boiled during Fahrenheit 9/11 and Outfoxed—and really, for everyone else as well—the enraging Canadian documentary The Corporation examines the roots of the modern corporation's unscrupulous disregard for human life. Don't miss the post-film panel discussion Tuesday night hosted by Scene contributor and Vanderbilt management professor Bruce Barry.

But the main attraction in Nashville theaters this week is one of the coolest movies ever made: the restored version of Sergio Leone's 1968 masterpiece Once Upon a Time in the West, starring Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards, and above all—cast brilliantly against type as the baddest villain in movie history—a pale-eyed Henry Fonda. The big screen is the only home for a movie such as this, with its mile-wide panoramas of Western landscapes, its breathtaking deep-focus cinematography, and images of gunfights and showdowns that seem to have come from the moviegoer's subconscious. It plays at the Belcourt for one week only, and only a fool would miss it.

—Jim Ridley

But the main attraction in Nashville theaters this week is one of the coolest movies ever made: the restored version of Sergio Leone's 1968 masterpiece Once Upon a Time in the West, starring Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards, and above all—cast brilliantly against type as the baddest villain in movie history—a pale-eyed Henry Fonda. The big screen is the only home for a movie such as this, with its mile-wide panoramas of Western landscapes, its breathtaking deep-focus cinematography, and images of gunfights and showdowns that seem to have come from the moviegoer's subconscious. It plays at the Belcourt for one week only, and only a fool would miss it.

—Jim Ridley

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