The Del McCoury Band/Ralph Stanley ♦ Thursday, 7/12 

Music

Music

If bluegrass never becomes wildly popular, it won’t be the Del McCoury Band’s fault. The quintet’s genial, silver-haired namesake, sons Ron and Rob, and longtime members Mike Bub and Jason Carter flawlessly combine a mastery of tradition with a cutting-edge sensibility that has endeared them to audiences far beyond the bluegrass faithful. Their latest album, Del & the Boys (Ceili Records), which just hit stores this week, finds them tackling songs that span the distance between folk-rocker Richard Thompson and Opry stalwart Jeanne Pruett, but onstage, they range even more freely through over than three decades’ worth of Del’s recordings. Sharply dressed and ganged around a single microphone, the McCoury crew’s appearance recalls the style of bluegrass’s golden era, but there’s not a trace of mustiness in the music itself, nor in the easygoing, informal good humor that pervades their show’s extra-musical moments. Like McCoury, Ralph Stanley’s swiftly becoming an unlikely star in a wider musical sky. A contributor to (and beneficiary of) O Brother, Where Art Thou?’s unexpected success, he’s been universally acclaimed for his inescapably mournful voice and low-key but unshakable musical integrity. The combination of the two artists ought to make for an especially enlightening—and entertaining—evening at the Ryman.

—J.W.

Thursday, 12th

Hunter Moore One of Nashville’s well-kept secrets, New England transplant Moore is an incisive singer-songwriter whose literary originals gain resonance on record from their tasteful, less-is-more settings. On Conversations, Moore’s luminous new album, he gets help from Buddy and Julie Miller cohorts Phil Madeira and Steve Hindalong and sounds a lot like early Bruce Cockburn. Moore will celebrate the release of the album, a song cycle inspired by Robert Frost’s North of Boston, with a 7:30 p.m. show at Radio Cafe.

—B.F.W.

War Jill Cunniff of Luscious Jackson once said that her band’s whole purpose in life was to re-create the kind of deep joyful feeling that she received from an outdoor War concert when she was a teenager. According to all reports, the current incarnation of the band (which contains pretty much the core lineup from the ’70s heyday) can still bring it, mixing up soulful sing-alongs with “take a look at yourself” message songs, giving meaning to good times. Let them inspire you and turn you on in their natural setting—outdoors at Dancin’ in the District.

—N.M.

Friday, 13th

Audity Central WRVU-91.1 FM and the Elevator Music Collective host this monthly showcase of electronic dance music, featuring some of the area’s heaviest hitters in drum-and-bass, house, acid jazz, and other styles. Included are 91 Abstractions host DJ Chek, DJ Mindub from 91’s Underground Alarm Clock, DJ Spoon, and DJ Jolby. The 18-and-over show is at The End.

Friday, 13th-Saturday, 14th

Joe Savage In the late 1970s, as the punk scene here was starting to simmer in hole-in-the-wall clubs, the opposite extreme was Joe Savage and his Vegas-bound rock ’n’ roll revue—confetti, explosions, a live snake, the works. Some of that glitzy grandiosity can still be found in his hyperbolic press kit: “A highly educated intellectual who is also a consummate performer...his larger-than-life image immediately suggests the unconventional touch of genius that lies beneath.” Like we said, the guy’s got a snake. The bald-pated showman is taking the stage this weekend at the military-themed 101st Airborne restaurant on Murfreesboro Road—where you can see the act that hypnotized audiences from Lion’s Head to the Lion’s Den Lounge at Bally’s Reno. Savage plays two shows each night, 10 p.m. and midnight.

—J.R.

Friday, 13th-Sunday, 15th

The 24th Annual Uncle Dave Macon Days Old-Time Music & Dance Festival Few events make the summer heat more tolerable than Murfreesboro’s annual celebration of old-time fiddling, singing, clogging, and banjo playing, hosted in tribute to native son and legendary showman Uncle Dave Macon. Held every year at Cannonsburgh Village, 312 S. Front St., in the shadow of the world’s largest cedar bucket, the festival draws world-class singers, buck dancers, and musicians to compete for cash prizes and national honors. But it’s as much fun to stroll the grounds, where every patch of shade becomes an impromptu pickin’ parlor. The event is free and open to the public; the finals are Saturday night, with a gospel showcase Sunday. For more information, call (800) 716-7560 or visit www.uncledavemacondays.org. Convolution w/Mark Cunningham & Silvia Mestres I cannot stress how great this show will be. Anyone familiar with Cunningham’s group Mars, or the hallowed 1978 Eno-produced No Wave scene document No New York on which they appeared, will already be salivating. Since the early ’90s, Cunningham has lived in Barcelona, collaborating with Spanish guitarist Gat in Raeo and with French iconoclast Pascal Comelade. His latest group, Convolution, described as a “total artistic alliance” between Cunningham on trumpet and Barcelona visual artist/singer Sílvie Mestres, stakes out common ground between the freest of jazz and rock forms and ambient electronica. The result is music that is compelling and enjoyable and not complacent. And Mestres’ accompanying visuals are absolutely stunning. (For proof, visit www.arrakis.es/~silmes.) Anyone self-satisfied that everything has been done before—in visual art or music—needs to find out otherwise at this 9:30 p.m. show at ruby green contemporary art center. John Wesley Harding One of the week’s must-see shows: a hastily arranged solo acoustic gig at The Sutler by a guy who single-handedly redeems the phrase “singer-songwriter.” If it’s earnest navel-gazing and steel-stringed solipsism you want, scram: Harding combines keen popcraft and switchblade wit with the wildest, woolliest aspects of the folk tradition. There’s certainly nobody doing the Woody Guthrie talking-blues better or funnier—one reason his live shows are such a blast. And since there’s no opening act, just undiluted, industrial-strength WesRyan Adams After years of starting and stopping with Whiskeytown—making boasts, then generating half-realized records before replacing band members and trying again—Adams is finally starting to get it together. Last year’s solo debut Heartbreaker was both assured and movingly delicate, and this year’s grand finale for Whiskeytown—the eclectic and adventurous country-rock reinvention of Pneumonia—shows that there may well have been a method in his madness after all. Later this year, Adams will release a double-disc follow-up to HeartbreakerN.M.

The Obscure/Manmade Brain/The Igniters For fans of straight-up rock ’n’ roll, there is no better option than Springwater’s diverse triple scoop. The Obscure offer Detroit-fueled Stooge rock updated with post-emo melodicism. The Igniters of rock capital Dayton, Ohio, also mine a no-frills approach—this time in the tradition of a less Anglophilic Guided By Voices. In fact, early Guided By Voices guitarist Mitch Mitchell is a recent addition to the outfit. And anyone who has seen Mobile, Ala.’s inscrutable noise pranksters XBXRX or one of the official franchisees of cult surf-act Man or Astro Man? will expect great things of Manmade Brain. The combo, sharing members of each, will explore themes of sonic geekdom with an intensity somewhere between that of off-duty waiters and Man Machine Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers If you want to get a sense of Petty’s small but firm place in rock history, just run through a list of his opening lines: “Honey don’t walk out / I’m too drunk to follow,” or “We got something / We both know it / We don’t talk too much about it,” or “You think you’re gonna take her away / With your money and your cocaine,” or “She was an American girl / Raised on promises.” Nobody knows how to start a song better than Tom Petty. He’s not bad at endings either, and his middles are pretty great. He’ll be rocking the AmSouth Amphitheatre with opener Jackson Browne, who has some great lines of his own. Rhonda Vincent & the Rage All but lost among the hubbub surrounding the bluegrass and mountain music revival sparked by the O Brother soundtrack is Vincent’s exquisite new album, The Storm Still Rages. Not only is the record even better than last year’s Back Home Again; it confirms what ’grassers have known for years: Vincent is perhaps the most gifted and visionary young bandleader working in the idiom today. She and her aptly named band, the Rage, return to The Station Inn.

—B.F.W.

Rodney Crowell Always a gifted guy, Crowell has really come into his own this year. In January, he released The Houston Kid, a career album and one of the most inspired autobiographical records ever. This summer, his essay explicating “I Walk the Line Revisited,” a song from the album, was among the high points of Songs Without Rhyme: Prose by Celebrated Songwriters, a collection edited by his ex, Rosanne Cash. And forthcoming is The House on Norvic Street, a memoir of his hard-knock childhood in East Houston. To say the least, Crowell ought to be riding high when he and his band headline WRLT-100.1 FM’s Nashville Sunday Night at 3rd & Lindsley.

—B.F.W.

Tuesday, 17th

reggae night at The End Each Tuesday, The End is hosting a night of heavy Jamaican riddims, courtesy of local DJ Half Stepper Sound System, who spins a mix of vintage roots reggae and more recent remixes of dance-hall tunes. Depending on your mood, reggae is the perfect chill-out soundtrack, or it can make for great dance music. Ably assisted by Craig Allen of the local dub project Phase Selector Sound, Half Stepper brings his deep love for reggae music into The End each week, making the Elliston Place club a fine hang on what can be an otherwise dull night.

Wednesday, 18th

Rancid/Me First And The Gimme Gimmes Most of the acts on the Warped Tour—stopping at AmSouth Amphitheatre this week—are pretty thudding, but the show might just be worth enduring for these two bands. Rancid have been growing out of their Clash-iness (for better or worse), but they retain the ferocity and concision that marked their outstanding records ...And Out Come the Wolves and Life Won’t Wait. Meanwhile, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes are a gimmick act with an enjoyable gimmick—thrash-punk versions of pop-rock standards. The two of them together are worth the $20, though the misery of sitting through Sum 41, Good Charlotte, and 311 is what we call a “hidden cost.”

—N.M.

Film

Bastille Day Film Festival As part of Bastille Day celebrations in Hillsboro Village, the Belcourt is screening a grab-bag of French-language films throughout the week. Included are Jean-Paul Rappeneau’s grandly entertaining 1990 version of Cyrano de Bergerac, with Gerard Depardieu a delight as the swashbuckling poet; François Truffaut’s invigorating early short “Les Mistons,” in which some mischievous boys explore their first stirrings of sexual interest by hounding two young lovers; and “Bon Voyage” and “Aventure Malgache,” a pair of suspense shorts made for the French Resistance movement by none other than Alfred Hitchcock. See our Movie Clock for dates and show times and our Film Listings for more information.

—J.R.

It Happened Here/Atlantis/I Am Cuba The Belcourt is showing several weeks’ worth of treasures from distributor Milestone Films’ vaults; if you hurry, you still have a day left to catch I Am Cuba, which drew an unexpected turnout last weekend. And the theater is holding over Luc Besson’s undersea voyage Atlantis and the fake documentary

—J.R.

Bonnie & Clyde Faye Dunaway is Bonnie, Warren Beatty is Clyde, and they act like what they are—the stars of their own really cool gangster movie—until they die writhing in a hail of bullets. Decried as the nadir of movie violence when released in 1967, Arthur Penn’s New Wave-influenced crime drama was years ahead of its time; it shows this Saturday and Sunday in a 35mm print at the Belcourt as part of the theater’s “American Outlaws” series of movie classics.

—J.R.

The Mirror Jafar Panahi scored an international hit with his 1995 film The White Balloon, the first Iranian film ever released in this country; this 1997 film reunites the writer-director with his young star, Mina Mohammad Khani, who plays a girl left to roam the streets of Tehran when her mother fails to pick her up from school. Then comes a mid-film twist that shifts attention from the story to the movie itself. The acclaimed film receives its first local screenings through Saturday at Sarratt, courtesy of Nashville Premieres.

—J.R.

Sexy Beast The latest model in lad-movie brutality—a sleek British gangster thriller with top-of-the-line violence and brittle black humor. Retired thug Ray Winstone gets an unwanted visit from the worst of his old associates: a blunt, wiry psycho played with Pinter-esque brio by Ben Kingsley. The movie opens Friday at Green Hills; see the review on p. 37.

—J.R.

The Anniversary Party A few hits of E, plus a houseful of Hollywood couples with awful secrets to spill, add up to the worst party ever in this digital comedy-drama written and directed by actors Jennifer Jason Leigh and Alan Cumming. Kevin Kline, Gwyneth Paltrow, John C. Reilly, and Phoebe Cates are among the guests; the movie starts Friday at Green Hills. Legally Blonde Former Nashvillian Reese Witherspoon plays a sorority babe who takes legal action after being dumped by her boyfriend—by pursuing him to law school. Luke Wilson and Holland Taylor appear in the comedy, which opens Friday at local theaters. Also, opening on Wednesday: the all-CGI video-game adaptation

—J.R.

The Score The plot involves an aging thief pressed into one last heist, but more promising is the idea of dream-team co-stars Robert DeNiro, Edward Norton, Marlon Brando, and Angela Bassett competing to steal scenes. Frank Oz directed this caper thriller, which starts Friday.

—J.R.

Die Hard Yippee-ki-yay! John McTiernan’s 1988 blockbuster works mostly because of the chemistry between its two antagonists: a delectably devious Alan Rickman, as a terrorist leader with a high-rise full of hostages, and cop Bruce Willis, his outmanned but underestimated foe. The two-disc DVD comes with a serious stash of loot, including deleted scenes, a gag reel, and an editing-bay feature that allows viewers to assemble their own cuts of different scenes.

—J.R.

13 Days This overlooked Cuban Missile Crisis docudrama—a gripper, if marred by a goofy Kevin Costner performance—deserves a big audience on home video. As if to assure added attention, New Line is using the DVD edition to launch their “Infinifilm” concept. Commentaries by the filmmakers are included, as are comments taken from speeches by JFK, Khrushchev, Pierre Salinger, and others. There’s also the standard mix of multi-angle effects featurettes, mini-docs, and deleted scenes. But what makes it an “Infinifilm” is a feature that enables the viewer to stop the film at selected spots and to view archival footage and/or historical text related to the scene in question.

—N.M.

The Lady Eve One of the slicker Preston Sturges comedies—starring Henry Fonda as a rich rube who gets flummoxed by Barbara Stanwyck while on a cruise—gets a deluxe Criterion edition, featuring commentary by film scholar Marian Keane, a scrapbook of behind-the-scenes stills, an intro by Peter Bogdanovich, and the complete Lux Radio Theater adaptation of the film.

—N.M.

Theater

ANNIE Yeah, we know—it’s schmaltzy, corny, overdone, and no one wants to hear the song “Tomorrow” ever again. But Chaffin’s Barn Dinner Theatre’s been putting the kiddies through their paces at their Annie Camp—that’s right, Annie Camp—in preparation for this revival. So if director David Compton can get children, dogs, and adults all on the same page, his production should offer a good time for theatergoers who love their musicals in the old-fashioned mode. It’s solid summer family fare too. Opens July 18.

—M.B.

betty’s summer vacation Christopher Durang’s shocking, off-the-wall comedy takes a look at the effects of Springer-esque tabloid journalism on our modern age. Bob O’Connell directs this summer production for ACT I, with a cast that includes Jennifer Wilke, Cinda McCain, Lisa Marie Smith, Jonathan Root, Marshall Stern, and Bobby Moore, among others. Opens July 13 at the Darkhorse Theater.

—M.B.

GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL FINALE July 12-14 marks the final days of events involving participants in the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts, a four-week summer residence program at MTSU offering intensive study in art, ballet, theater, and music for gifted high school students. Main events will be held at three venues: a visual arts exhibit at MTSU’s Art Barn; opera scenes and classical music performances at Wright Music Building; and dance and theater performances at Tucker Theatre. Theater participants will offer a rendering of Farid ud-Din Attar’s epic Sufi poem, “The Conference of the Birds,” in which the birds of the world gather to search for their king, the mysterious Simorgh. All events take place on the MTSU campus; call 898-2300 for further details. The Attic Gallery Remember when you were an artist? For most of us, that was when we were kids and our brightly colored and often brilliantly imagined drawings decorated our parents’ lives and refrigerators. San Francisco artist Dave Warnke is all grown up now, but he seeks to “recapture the joy and vitality” of childhood drawings in the acrylic paintings he calls his “Happy Art.” Filled with funny faces, simplified shapes, and peculiar creatures at play in imaginary, whimsical landscapes, Warnke’s works are sure to evoke a smile of recognition from viewers. Drop by and see them at the opening reception 6-9 p.m. July 13. Tennessee Arts Commission Gallery Each year the Tennessee Arts Commission presents its Individual Artist Fellowship awards in the performing, visual, and literary arts. The visual arts honorees receive not only a cash award but also a chance to show off their works at the commission’s downtown gallery. This year’s winners are sculptor and installation artist Adrienne Outlaw and crafts artisan Tis Mal Crow. See Outlaw’s fabric-based sculptures that reference domesticity and the female voice and Crow’s life-size dolls inspired by the artist’s Cherokee, United Lumbee, and Hitchiti heritage, and meet the artists at the opening reception 4-7 p.m. July 13.

—A.W.

Zeitgeist The gallery’s popular “Switchyard” summer series is back. The show is actually broken down into three segments, with the art switching out every few weeks. The gallery’s goal is to showcase as many emerging artists whose works may be new to Nashville art lovers as possible. You’ll see works in all media by 18 such artists, including no less than eight women, always an under-represented category in contemporary art exhibits. Each installment kicks off with an opening reception, the first of which is 6-8 p.m. July 14.

—A.W.

Nick Hornby In the best-seller High Fidelity, Hornby explored pop culture through male characters, decidedly part of all that is hip and cool. His How to Be Good, released just this month, is a departure from those ultra-aware twentysomethings. Set in suburban North London, the novel opens with a typical nuclear family at the very moment that all normalcy ceases. Katie Carr, doctor and mother of two, is in the midst of a boring, predictable life and wants to end her marriage of 24 years; her husband, however, has other plans. For the first time, Hornby introduces a female lead voice. On the John Hughes scale, if High Fidelity is The Breakfast Club, then How to Be Good would assuredly be Hornby’s Whoopi Goldberg Before Goldberg was a Secret Square, before she hosted the Oscars—before she accepted an Oscar for 1990’s Ghost—she was delivering pungent, pointed character monologues in her triumphant 1984 one-woman show on Broadway. For the first time in 10 years, Goldberg is touring in a new stage show, “One Night Only,” that’s billed as “an evening of candid observations about the world.” If that means a return to her vivid creations, like the sardonic junkie Fontaine—and an end to the dead-on-arrival Bruce Vilanch zingers that make her Oscar appearances such a pain

—J.R.

Sherman Hemsley An actor can play a character so indelibly that the role remains attached to him for the remainder of his career. But we’re here to tell you there’s more to Sherman Hemsley than just his role as Willie Goode on the 1996 sitcom Goode Behavior. There was that long-running TV show he had—you know, Amen? And his movie career dates back to 1979’s Love at First Bite, with appearances along the way in Stewardess School, Mr. Nanny, and Screwed. We can’t help but feel we’re forgetting something—but hey, the guy’s résumé already reads like a phone book. So move on up to Zanies, where Hemsley’s finally got a piece of the pie doing his one-man show 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Sunday night.

—J.R.

Celebration of Cultures No matter where your family’s roots lie, you’ll probably see that country and culture represented at this excellent festival showcasing the diversity of Middle Tennessee. This year you and the kids can make Chinese lanterns together at the children’s arts activity area, listen to Latin music and watch Irish folk dancing on six performance stages, and munch on African American soul food or Indian curry at an array of food booths. You can also shop the world at an international bazaar and pick up information on English language programs, exchange programs, and services to internationals. The free festival takes place 10 a.m.-8 p.m. July 14 at the Scarritt-Bennett Center, 1008 19th Ave. S.

Picks written by Martin Brady, Chris Davis, Bill Friskics-Warren, Angela Messina, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Jon Weisberger, and Angela Wibking.

Theater

ANNIE Yeah, we know—it’s schmaltzy, corny, overdone, and no one wants to hear the song “Tomorrow” ever again. But Chaffin’s Barn Dinner Theatre’s been putting the kiddies through their paces at their Annie Camp—that’s right, Annie Camp—in preparation for this revival. So if director David Compton can get children, dogs, and adults all on the same page, his production should offer a good time for theatergoers who love their musicals in the old-fashioned mode. It’s solid summer family fare too. Opens July 18.

—M.B.

betty’s summer vacation Christopher Durang’s shocking, off-the-wall comedy takes a look at the effects of Springer-esque tabloid journalism on our modern age. Bob O’Connell directs this summer production for ACT I, with a cast that includes Jennifer Wilke, Cinda McCain, Lisa Marie Smith, Jonathan Root, Marshall Stern, and Bobby Moore, among others. Opens July 13 at the Darkhorse Theater.

—M.B.

GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL FINALE July 12-14 marks the final days of events involving participants in the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts, a four-week summer residence program at MTSU offering intensive study in art, ballet, theater, and music for gifted high school students. Main events will be held at three venues: a visual arts exhibit at MTSU’s Art Barn; opera scenes and classical music performances at Wright Music Building; and dance and theater performances at Tucker Theatre. Theater participants will offer a rendering of Farid ud-Din Attar’s epic Sufi poem, “The Conference of the Birds,” in which the birds of the world gather to search for their king, the mysterious Simorgh. All events take place on the MTSU campus; call 898-2300 for further details. The Attic Gallery Remember when you were an artist? For most of us, that was when we were kids and our brightly colored and often brilliantly imagined drawings decorated our parents’ lives and refrigerators. San Francisco artist Dave Warnke is all grown up now, but he seeks to “recapture the joy and vitality” of childhood drawings in the acrylic paintings he calls his “Happy Art.” Filled with funny faces, simplified shapes, and peculiar creatures at play in imaginary, whimsical landscapes, Warnke’s works are sure to evoke a smile of recognition from viewers. Drop by and see them at the opening reception 6-9 p.m. July 13. Tennessee Arts Commission Gallery Each year the Tennessee Arts Commission presents its Individual Artist Fellowship awards in the performing, visual, and literary arts. The visual arts honorees receive not only a cash award but also a chance to show off their works at the commission’s downtown gallery. This year’s winners are sculptor and installation artist Adrienne Outlaw and crafts artisan Tis Mal Crow. See Outlaw’s fabric-based sculptures that reference domesticity and the female voice and Crow’s life-size dolls inspired by the artist’s Cherokee, United Lumbee, and Hitchiti heritage, and meet the artists at the opening reception 4-7 p.m. July 13.

—A.W.

Zeitgeist The gallery’s popular “Switchyard” summer series is back. The show is actually broken down into three segments, with the art switching out every few weeks. The gallery’s goal is to showcase as many emerging artists whose works may be new to Nashville art lovers as possible. You’ll see works in all media by 18 such artists, including no less than eight women, always an under-represented category in contemporary art exhibits. Each installment kicks off with an opening reception, the first of which is 6-8 p.m. July 14.

—A.W.

Nick Hornby In the best-seller High Fidelity, Hornby explored pop culture through male characters, decidedly part of all that is hip and cool. His How to Be Good, released just this month, is a departure from those ultra-aware twentysomethings. Set in suburban North London, the novel opens with a typical nuclear family at the very moment that all normalcy ceases. Katie Carr, doctor and mother of two, is in the midst of a boring, predictable life and wants to end her marriage of 24 years; her husband, however, has other plans. For the first time, Hornby introduces a female lead voice. On the John Hughes scale, if High Fidelity is The Breakfast Club, then How to Be Good would assuredly be Hornby’s Whoopi Goldberg Before Goldberg was a Secret Square, before she hosted the Oscars—before she accepted an Oscar for 1990’s Ghost—she was delivering pungent, pointed character monologues in her triumphant 1984 one-woman show on Broadway. For the first time in 10 years, Goldberg is touring in a new stage show, “One Night Only,” that’s billed as “an evening of candid observations about the world.” If that means a return to her vivid creations, like the sardonic junkie Fontaine—and an end to the dead-on-arrival Bruce Vilanch zingers that make her Oscar appearances such a pain

—J.R.

Sherman Hemsley An actor can play a character so indelibly that the role remains attached to him for the remainder of his career. But we’re here to tell you there’s more to Sherman Hemsley than just his role as Willie Goode on the 1996 sitcom Goode Behavior. There was that long-running TV show he had—you know, Amen? And his movie career dates back to 1979’s Love at First Bite, with appearances along the way in Stewardess School, Mr. Nanny, and Screwed. We can’t help but feel we’re forgetting something—but hey, the guy’s résumé already reads like a phone book. So move on up to Zanies, where Hemsley’s finally got a piece of the pie doing his one-man show 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Sunday night.

—J.R.

Celebration of Cultures No matter where your family’s roots lie, you’ll probably see that country and culture represented at this excellent festival showcasing the diversity of Middle Tennessee. This year you and the kids can make Chinese lanterns together at the children’s arts activity area, listen to Latin music and watch Irish folk dancing on six performance stages, and munch on African American soul food or Indian curry at an array of food booths. You can also shop the world at an international bazaar and pick up information on English language programs, exchange programs, and services to internationals. The free festival takes place 10 a.m.-8 p.m. July 14 at the Scarritt-Bennett Center, 1008 19th Ave. S.

Picks written by Martin Brady, Chris Davis, Bill Friskics-Warren, Angela Messina, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Jon Weisberger, and Angela Wibking.

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