Pick Of The Week ♦ July 1st 

Tan as Fuck, The Dutchies

Tan as Fuck, The Dutchies

These two local bands end a two-week national tour together with a show in their hometown at Guido’s Pizzeria (site of some of the best live music in town of late). Tan As Fuck belong to the surge of tweaked noise-and-electronics outfits emerging from the nation’s musical underground in recent years. As with their mischievous colleagues Wolf Eyes and Nautical Almanac, this trio’s most obvious musical predecessors are the first-wave industrial outfits of the early 1980s (before the term “industrial” came to be associated simply with disaffected dance music). They bring a spirit of innovation and improvisation to their outpourings, which are broad enough to encompass quietly whirring hums, shrieking chaos and sick, twisted, loping grooves—sometimes all at once. Such experimentation can result in stretches of tedium, but it also results in plenty of moments when the sounds of human voices, altered electronic circuitry, clattering percussion and honking alto sax converge into something revelatory, incantatory and even mind-altering. And, as the group’s three self-released CDs suggest, they’re getting better and better at what they do. Tan As Fuck member Angela Messina doubles as a member of The Dutchies, a trio who borrow liberally from the punk aesthetic, but make a sound rawer and rougher than most garage bands; at their best, they’re both catchy and caustic. Both groups should have CDs for sale at this show, which’ll be a perfect opportunity to witness some of the most interesting music being made in Nashville right now.

—J.M.

This week’s picks by Martin Brady, Heather Johnson, Jonathan Marx, Michael McCall, Steve Morley, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Joshua H. Rothkopf, Jon Weisberger, Angela Wibking and Ron Wynn.

Music

Thursday, 26th

Laura Cantrell Cantrell may be the first Nashvillian to start a country career by leaving Music City for Brooklyn. Which only means that in 30 years she may be regarded as an urban pioneer and role model—the Kitty Wells of post-punk honky-tonk. Recently back from a European tour and a session with BBC Radio 1’s legendary deejay John Peel (who had her perform originals and covers like The Undertones’ “Teenage Kicks” right through the night), Cantrell returns home stoked with sterling ready-mades from her latest LP When the Roses Bloom Again (and maybe some new tunes). Slow Bar

—J.R.

Catherine Britt, Jim Lauderdale, Jerry Salley & Keith Stegall This strong in-the-round combines a trio of country veterans with a promising teen who’s getting ready to return to her native Australia after a couple months of writing songs in Nashville. Stegall’s record as a producer is so stellar that his writing often gets overlooked, while Salley and Lauderdale are in peak form these days; Britt, signed by RCA a few months ago, has been the deserving object of a low-level but sustained buzz built around comparisons to Kasey Chambers and Patsy Cline. Bluebird Cafe

—J.W.

Vince Gill In recent years, Gill has been among the few country stars who have kept trying to nudge the music back toward its roots. He’s most convincing when concentrating on the mountain-influenced side of his repertoire, as he will when he assumes the headline slot at this week’s segment of the Bluegrass at the Ryman series. Ryman Auditorium

—M.McK.

Betty Dylan The husband-and-wife team of Dan and Vickie Dubelman left Los Angeles not long ago and relocated to Bloomington, Ind. In the meantime, they’ve released a cool new album called Heart Land, an unpretentious collection of hard-edged originals, plus engaging covers of “Folsom Prison Blues” and “Your Cheatin’ Heart.” Catch them as a part of this 6:30 p.m. in-the-round. Bluebird Cafe

M.B.

James McMurtry McMurtry’s acoustic rock anticipated the Americana movement by nearly a decade; to his credit, he’s survived on the margins of the mainstream with wryly humorous songs peopled with three-dimensional characters and situations. His gift with words may be handed down from his dad, the author of Lonesome Dove, but his quirky perspective is his own. 12th & Porter

—S.M.

Friday, 27th

The Fabulosos feat. Raul Malo In the ’90s, when Malo’s band The Mavericks ranked as Music Row’s hippest country act, the burly, big-voiced Cuban American fronted a side project that gave him a chance to croon covers of Sinatra and Mancini in front of a modified big band. Now that The Mavericks are preparing a comeback, Malo again challenges himself with a secondary project featuring master musicians, this time packed with guys—Kenny Greenberg on guitar, Glen Worf on bass and Chad Cromwell on drums—known for pushing a singer with groove and stinging fills.

—M.McK.

Adam Wyle On his Marvin Etzioni-produced CD Proof, rising Chicago singer-songwriter Wyle fares best singing sweetly simmering folk-pop over emphatically sparse arrangements, which highlight the gentle longing in his Roddy Frame-like vocals. The karaoke-duet “Walk on the Wild Side” wasn’t such a hot idea, though. French Quarter Cafe

—J.R.

Tennessee Gentlemen Hardworking bluegrass vets from the western part of the state, the Gentlemen have built a reputation around good country songs and the powerful high lead vocals of Donny Catron, recently heard with Jesse McReynolds on the Grand Ole Opry. The Station Inn

—J.W.

Edmund’s Crown Earlier in 2003, this local alt-pop trio assembled the best of their three years of recording onto one disc, which features some of the hooky, loud tracks the band have licensed for use on the World Wrestling Federation’s Tough Enough series, as well as a handful of other TV dramas. Sherlock Holmes

—N.M.

Saturday, 28th

Rock Williams Saxophonist Williams will be the final musician to perform as part of the ongoing live series at Jazz on White Bridge Road. Sadly, it’s also the final call for Nashville’s only jazz and blues specialty store, which will be closing just a few days short of what would have been its third anniversary. Owner Ed Smith performed a yeoman’s service, both for the city and for Nashville’s jazz and blues communities, with this enterprise, something you’d usually see only in the likes of New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. Everyone is urged to stop by, not only to hear Williams’ strong solos, but also to bid farewell to Smith’s fine record outlet. Jazz

—R.W.

David Kilgour & The Heavy Eights Despite a relatively small recorded output over their 25 fitful years of existence, Kilgour’s band The Clean have had a remarkable influence on American indie rock. The New Zealanders’ recent Anthology shows them dragging Velvet Underground-derived drone into the post-punk era, with Kilgour supplying jump-out-of-the-speaker jangle layered with syrup-sweet, distortion-heavy solos. Kilgour’s solo efforts have been almost as fine, his recent Feather in the Engine showcasing intricate guitar patterns and warm buzz. It’s been nearly a decade since he last played Nashville, and both of his weekend shows (see below) should be packed with indie-rock cultists, including the loyal flock of local musicians backing him onstage. Word has it that audience members can expect Kilgour to throw at least a few Clean songs into his set. Slow Bar

—N.M.

Deana Carter Surviving a divorce from both her husband and her former label, Carter has reemerged on Arista Nashville with I’m Just a Girl, her first album in five years. Her move to Los Angeles seems to have shaped her new material, which is closer to Sheryl Crow’s polished pop-rock than even her previous records. She shares a bill with Heart. AmSouth Amphitheatre

—H.J.

The Shazam That foot-stomping, canyon-filling rock music you’ve been hearing on the new Coors commercial is none other than the opening bars of “Goodbye American Man” by this Nashville power-pop band, taken from their raucous and tuneful LP Tomorrow the World. 12th & Porter

—N.M.

Sunday, 29th

Caitlin Cary Former Whiskeytown fiddle player Cary seems more comfortable than ever with her solo artist status on her latest album, I’m Staying Out. Her neo-country melodies flirt confidently with folk, soul and rock, which just makes her story-like verses more engaging. “You Don’t Have to Hide” has a ’70s countrypolitan vibe, while the sweeping honky-tonk of “Please Break My Heart” channels Patsy Cline. A good fiddle player and a soulful vocalist, Cary puts on a great show, which is more than you can say of her unpredictable former bandmate, Ryan Adams. 3rd & Lindsley

—H.J.

David Kilgour & The Heavy Eights If you miss Kilgour’s special Saturday-night engagement at Slow Bar (see above), you’ve got a second chance to see him, along with Dave Cloud’s Gospel of Power, Nashville rock balladeers who are becoming increasingly popular in Kilgour’s native New Zealand. Springwater

—N.M.

Violinsanity Because the violin hasn’t been a heralded instrument in jazz circles, it’s often assumed that the only violinists who’ve made their mark on the genre are deceased greats like Stuff Smith, Joe Venuti and Stephane Grappelli. But the latest concert sponsored by the Tennessee Jazz & Blues Society demonstrates that there are still superb contemporary players, most notably Peter Hykra (better known as one-third of the Gypsy Hombres) and fiery stylists Tracy Silverman and Martin Norgaard. In addition to being gifted, all are eclectic, and all can effectively display their skills doing “hot” jazz, blues, folk, pop or swing material. Belle Meade Plantation

—R.W.

Songwriter Survivor This tribute to cultural trends combines the freewheeling atmosphere of a Chicago-style poetry slam with the sobriety of local songwriter’s nights and the last-man-standing ethos of the television show Survivor. Contestants compete for various prizes—including recording-studio time—with a three-person panel of judges making the final deliberations. The wonderfully amiable and deadpan Derek Wolfe hosts the proceedings. The contest continues for several weeks until a grand prize winner is declared. The performing begins at 7 p.m. on Sunday evenings. For more information on how to get a chance to strut your stuff, phone 479-5282 or visit BongoJava.com. Bongo After Hours Theatre

—M.B.

Monday, 30th

Dave Gillon Benefit A member of the early ’70s country-rock band Tennessee Pulleybone, as well as a songwriter with cuts by George Strait and Ray Charles, Gillon was laid low by a massive stroke last November. After waking from a coma to face partial paralysis and significantly impaired faculties, Gillon, only 53, has fought through extensive therapy to reclaim his speech, his mobility, even his ability to recall his children’s names—but he now faces six-figure medical bills. To help defray the costs, this Billy Block-hosted fundraiser offers sets by Sixwire and Keith Anderson along with an in-the-round featuring Chely Wright, Irene Kelley, John Cowan, Kathy Chiavola, Gary Burr and surprise guests. If you can’t attend, send donations to the Dave Gillon Fund at Giving in Faith Together, 2804 Azalea Place, Nashville, TN 37204. Call 292-5804 for more information. Exit/In

—J.R.

Tuesday, 1st

The Mickeys Amy and Julie Mickey are identical twins from Michigan who moved to Nashville to attend Belmont University: They sing straightforward, sometimes peppy country/folk tunes in a style reminiscent of the Indigo Girls, minus any overtly political message. They play as a part of the Western Beat Roots Revival. Exit/In

—M.B.

Dana Glover Glover is a young singer with a compelling and soulful delivery that she applies to originals informed by Southern gospel and blue-eyed soul. Though a relative newcomer, Glover also has an international hit single, a track on the Shrek soundtrack and the support of Robbie Robertson, who signed her to DreamWorks. 3rd & Lindsley

—S.M.

Wednesday, 2nd

Daybreak Good young bands grow fast, and this youthful, Nashville-based quartet are already moving beyond the more than occasionally intense Nickel Creek influence that pervaded their self-released debut, First Light. Celtic, pop, bluegrass and less categorizable inspirations still predominate—sometimes not wholly digested—but Daybreak’s engaging voice is beginning to emerge. The Station Inn

—J.W.

Theater

Southern Writers’ Theatre Anniversary Party This evening of cabaret-style theater features scenes and songs from Southern Writers’ Theatre’s first recent year, which included productions of Torch Song Trilogy, Cafe Escargot, The Proposal and The Broken Hearts of Edgar Allan Poe. There will also be a sampling of plays scheduled for the company’s second, upcoming season. Entertainers include Bianca Paige, Angelica DeVil, Tony Domenico and belly dancer Rebecca Spiers. The event will be held at Jaded Mary’s, 1731 Church St., on Sunday, June 29, at 8 p.m. Admission is $6. For more information or to purchase advance tickets, call 726-0342 or e-mail Southernwriterstheatre@yahoo.com. M.B.

Comedy

James Gregory A longtime veteran of the comedy club scene, and an especially popular draw in the South, Gregory revels in the joys of eating fatty foods, unapologetically trumpets the fact that he’s been smoking for years, and tells jokes that involve pickup trucks, drywall and strange relatives. He has his devoted fans, and he packed ’em in the last time he was at Zanies. This June 26-28 engagement at the club should be no different. (Ironically, the early-evening shows on Friday and Saturday are smoke-free.) For reservations, phone 269-0221.

—M.B.

Art

Striped Door Gallery A new art gallery opening in downtown is always good news, but when it features artists like Peggy Snow, it’s really cause for celebration. Don’t miss the grand opening this weekend, when Striped Door will be showing Snow’s expressionistic architectural “portraits,” Robin Mink’s dynamic abstract paintings, Robert Harrell’s whimsical houses and trees in candy-colored bubbles, and figurative wood sculptures by the artist known as Tree. The artists’ reception is 5-8 p.m. June 28. You’ll find the new gallery (and parking) at the corner of Second and Lea Avenue, about a half-mile or so south of Broadway. Look for the brightly striped door on Second Avenue. A.W.

Royal Arms Apartment Complex If you frequent Goldie’s Deli in Belle Meade, you may have noticed the colorful, upbeat paintings on the walls. The works are by Max Morris, son of the owners, who works full time in the deli while maintaining his art studio in the basement. This week Morris ventures outside the family turf to present a show of his canvases in the Royal Arms event room, off Richard Jones Road in Green Hills. The show is 7-10 p.m. June 28 and the event will be fully catered by Goldie’s.

—A.W.

Leiper’s Fork Antiques The American West, past and present, is the subject of a new body of work by popular artist Anne Goetze Collie, who captures the grandeur of the Western landscape in scenes of towering mountains flanked by fields of wildflowers. Just as skillfully, she conveys the intimacy of rural life in paintings of roadside food stands with waving American flags, and she depicts nostalgic scenes of pioneers moving west in covered wagons and Native Americans in ceremonial dress. Collie’s impressionistic paintings highlight a show that also includes Bill Miller’s “Spirit Warrior” works (which will be featured in a PBS documentary this fall), as well as works by 10 other artists. The show closes June 30.

—A.W.

Tennessee State Museum An exhibition of 48 works by internationally renowned Tennessee glass artist Richard Jolley chronicles his creative evolution over the past 20 years. Included are his classically inspired figurative glass sculptures from the 1980s and ’90s and his newest works, which mix glass with copper, gold, aluminum and other metals. Some of the early pieces on display demonstrate Jolley’s breakthrough technique of heating selected portions of the glass until it can be manipulated spontaneously, without a restrictive mold. His newest pieces show the artist pushing the boundaries again in introspective, dream-like panels of glass and metal. The show is on view through Aug. 10.

—A.W.

Tennessee Crossroads Get a peek at what Nashville artist Randy Shepherd has been up to since being featured on Oprah with his 6-foot-tall, 500-pound sculpture called “9/11 The Morning After.” Shepherd is currently creating metal art with a military theme, as well as building custom cars and riding bulls in rodeos. He’ll be featured on the popular NPT-Channel 8 program, 7 p.m. June 26 and 10 a.m. June 29.

—A.W.

Books & Lectures

Three Generations of Islam This free, three-part lecture series at Frist Center for the Visual Arts addresses the experience of American Muslims. Individuals will discuss the Islamic faith, its influence on their lives and contemporary issues faced by Muslims. The series begins with economic research analyst and Muslim lay scholar Dr. Nour Naciri’s presentation “In the Service of God,” outlining the basic tenets of the Islamic faith, 6 p.m. June 26. The other dates in the series are July 3 and July 10.

—A.W.

Robert Gordon This Memphis music journalist and historian’s most recent book, Can’t Be Satisfied: The Life and Times of Muddy Waters, was originally published to acclaim about a year ago. Since then, the biography has served as the basis for an excellent PBS documentary, which simply couldn’t encompass the wealth of detail that the author has amassed about McKinley Morganfield’s life in Mississippi and Chicago, his musical exploits, his talented but generally little-known sidemen, and the amazing culture over which he presided as a blues king. If nothing else, Gordon’s essential volume proves that before there were gangsta rappers, there was Waters to show ’em how to make cool music, pack a rod (or a knife) and surround oneself with willing young females. Gordon will be signing copies of his book, 2 p.m. June 28 at Borders’ West End location. M.B.

Film

28 Days Later Trainspotting director Danny Boyle amps up that film’s snarky ethos (“Choose life”), yet still manages to double the irony in this superb horror flick showcasing fast-running carnivorous zombies. Guerrilla animal activists release a group of experimental monkeys infected with “rage”; 28 days later, a London bike messenger rises in the hospital to find his city completely depopulated, ravaged by an epidemic that may have swept the globe. Boyle’s post-apocalyptic odyssey to Manchester gets a dingy DV treatment that’s never inappropriate to the subject matter, but often inspired: a field of pansies smears into garish colors, adding immeasurably to the choking cynicism. The movie opens Friday at area theaters.

—J.H.R.

L’Auberge EspagnoleSeven foreign exchange students share a cramped Barcelona flat in Cédric Klapisch’s breezy sex comedy, which eventually justifies its steady stream of hothouse antics with unexpected pathos. The title, a French pun, can be interpreted as something like “Europudding,” and it’s refreshing to watch a familiar scenario steer clear of the cattiness one might anticipate from episodes of The Real World. If anything, these friends bond tighter as they deal with mostly external forces threatening to tip the balance; provocatively, there’s not an American among them. Note to Donald Rumsfeld: If this is the real world, we might consider joining it. The movie continues its run at the Green Hills 16.

—J.H.R.

The Man Without a Past Aki Kaurismäki’s prize-winning deadpan comedy taps into the same weather-worn dignity as Grapes of Wrath; here, the resilient scrappers are not dustbowl Okies but survivors of Finland’s devastating depression of the early ’90s. They live in abandoned shipping containers on the outskirts of town, largely forgotten but—apparently—not that torn up about it. Into their world drops an unnamed mechanic (Markku Peltola), viciously beaten into amnesia by roaming city thugs; the homeless people tend to him selflessly, rejuvenating him into something greater than he once was. A statement of grand compassion, this should be required viewing for all humans. The film runs through Thursday at Green Hills.

—J.H.R.

Shirin Neshat This Iranian-born visual artist has come into prominence at the forward edge of contemporary art filmmaking; her work combines a blend of stark compositional rigor (a signature of her late-’70s American art school training) with oblique, often powerful commentary on the female in the Muslim world. Neshat’s concentrated short films, often featuring women in bold defiance of the orthodoxy, have never been shown in her homeland, nor have they been produced there. (She films in Turkey.) An awareness of her own exile has crept into her work in recent years, making her artistic liberation as ironic as it is fascinating. Neshat will speak along with collaborator Shoja Azari, 7 p.m. June 27 at the Nashville Cultural Arts Project’s “Outta Site” lecture series; they plan to screen several works. For information or directions, call 244-6227.

—J.H.R.

Japón In Carlos Reygadas’ drama, one of the finds of the recent Nashville Film Festival, a painter retreats to a desolate canyon to commit suicide, only to have his zest for life rekindled by an old woman. Hailed for its 16 mm CinemaScope camera work, the movie opens Friday at the Belcourt.

—J.R.

The Guys To eulogize the eight men he lost in the WTC attack, a New York fire chief (Anthony LaPaglia) remembers his fallen comrades to an editor (Sigourney Weaver) who shapes his tributes into a memorial. Broadway director Jim Simpson (Weaver’s husband) directed this film version of Anne Nelson’s acclaimed play, which opens Friday at the Belcourt.

—J.R.

Whale Rider A word-of-mouth favorite from the festival circuit, Niki Caro’s drama concerns an 11-year-old girl (Keisha Castle-Hughes) in a patriarchal New Zealand tribe who proves her mettle as a leader when crisis arises. The well-received film opens Friday at Green Hills, along with Scott Baio in the indie romantic comedy The Bread, My Sweet. For more information, see the Movie Guide on p. 60.

—J.R.

Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle Ass-kicking cherubs Drew Barrymore, Cameron Diaz and Lucy Liu take on fallen Angel Demi Moore in the sequel to the giddy 2000 TV adaptation. Friday.

—J.R.

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