Love/Hate Mail 

His check cleared

My question is: Why publicize an idiot like Bill Bernstein ("Glorious Bastard," March 18)?

Randall Brady — Nashville

No contradictions in Bernstein

I'm unable to hear the contradictions in the beliefs and character of Bill Bernstein ("Glorious Bastard," March 18).

The author appears surprised that Jews sell guns. My grandfather and his brother sold guns in their store for 40 years.

The author appears surprised that Jews fire guns. My father, husband and son all learned to fire handguns and rifles.

The author appears surprised that Jews are conservative politically. Has he not heard of Joe Lieberman or Michael Savage.

Most people when known as people rather than stereotypes are filled with what may be considered contradictions. That's not a worse nightmare. That's being human.

What exactly is the story here? That a politically conservative Jew is a loving father and husband and welcomes guests into his home.

That's our tradition.

Maxine Schaefer

Compounding the problem

On your article "Glorious Bastard" (March 18), have you ever heard of the phrase, "If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem?" Why give part of the problem his 15 minutes of fame on your cover?

David Camp — Nashville

That's what they said about Sammy Davis Jr.

Bill Bernstein does not impress me ("Glorious Bastard," March 18). He's just a Jew with guns. Yawn.

Rhio Hirsch — Whites Creek

Uneasy rider

I am a bike rider in Nashville who knows the individual interviewed by Lindsay Ferrier; his responses are tell-tale of his identity ("Bike-Curious," March 18). He is extreme in his methods of, for lack of better term, "punishing" those motorists who choose to cause harm to bikers. Perhaps she should have interviewed a few other avid cyclists about their experiences. I have slapped the sides of cars, yelled/screamed at people (reminder: I have no horn as a vehicle does), as well as chased cars to the next stop sign or red light to rap my knuckles on their windows. However, I have never hawked loogies at people's cars, told a person, "I will fucking kill you," or wrestled someone to the ground.

Lindsay should also do a bit of reading on the matter of cyclists who have carried concealed weapons on their person, as well as riots that have occurred, but this not the case with the majority of bikers, just as I do not believe most drivers are going to run me literally off the road or throw full glasses of pink lemonade at me (both have happened to me). I believe the "dangerous lot" are writers such as Ferrier who do little research, in quality or quantity, for an opinion article people will understand as a truth for the masses.

Megan R. Stafford — Nashville

Protecting horses benefits us all

Your reporter, Christine Kreyling, did a fabulous job detailing the issues associated with the starving horses rescued and housed at the fairgrounds in November '09 ("All the Starving Horses," March 11). The Howlands and their attorney, John Norton, are absolutely not telling the truth about the condition of every horse, donkey and mule seized from the farm in Cannon County. At the fairgrounds, there were scores of professional horse people composed of veterinarians, farriers, vet techs, lifelong horsemen and women that can all testify to the near-death state of each animal rescued. The Farm Bureau chief only demonstrates the attitude guided by lined pockets and small, vacant minds. I am a native Nashvillian and am horrified as well as embarrassed that this is my state. A state that is aware of and allows abuse of innocent victims to occur. How about some new thoughts and perspective posed to the bastions of Farm Bureau? Rather than watching animals suffer by our hands, why not consider what revenue these animals bring to this state? Examples include: the shows and competitions (held in Memphis, Franklin, Shelbyville, Knoxville, etc.) that fill hotels with paying guests and who buy tickets, meals, gas, souvenirs, etc., while they are here. The state sales tax benefits. The local stores that support them. Why not just ask Tractor Supply how proud they are to call their international corporate home Brentwood, Tenn.? Tractor Supply, a publicly traded, highly regarded company, is headquartered in a state where starving, burning and mutilating horses and other four-legged creatures is simply a misdemeanor? ...

Aren't we all getting really sick of politics and insurance companies dictating our civility? Are we saying, "Yes, it is OK to watch the life go out of an animal's eyes due to not having anything to eat?" Are we not a compassionate and civilized bunch of people? I would prefer to think we are, and seek out meaningful solutions. Look at the math: See how horses and their supporting industry contribute huge dollars to the statewide economy — it will make the Farm Bureau's inflated dollar estimate pale in comparison. I give my full support to Rep. Sontany in getting this bill passed. Abusers need to be stopped. People — you can make a difference. Let your voice be heard.

Ame Arlt — Franklin

Spread the word

I read an article about proposed legislation in the TN legislature concerning animal abuse. Wisconsin is currently in the process of legislating this exact sort of law, currently listed as AB 747 (Assembly) and SB 555 (Senate). The sponsoring legislators are Assembly Rep. Nick Milroy and Sen. Bob Jauch. More information is available on the WI Legislature website, and also on our non-profit organization's website, www.thewindchilllegacy.org.

May you all be the voice for those who have no voice.

Polly Knoll Niemi — South Range, Wisc.

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