John Prine ♦ Wednesday, 10/10 

Music

Music

The press in this town raves about fair-to-middling songwriters with such regularity that it’s a good thing John Prine plays around here once in a while to remind us what real genius sounds like. This show, a benefit for the scholarship fund of the Children’s House Montessori School, will be his first in the magnificent Ford Theatre at the new Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. At $75, the tickets are steep, but it’s for a good cause, and you can’t beat the intimacy or acoustics—or the songwriting.

—B.F.W.

Thursday, 4th

The American Analog Set/Trabant/Glossary One of the best show lineups this week is at The End. The American Analog Set follow in a recent tradition of easygoing, mature indie rock à la Willard Grant Conspiracy and Yo La Tengo. Trabant are one of Nashville’s newest and sharpest instrumental bands. And Glossary are a force unto themselves, still cranking out some of the most accomplished and tasty classic rock this side of Pavement.

—T.A.

Tommy Castro Guitarist Castro has vaulted into the upper echelon of contemporary blues players over the past couple of years. He’s known for his explosive, rock-influenced solos, but his vocals and songwriting have also improved dramatically over his last few albums. Blind Pig Records just issued an anthology presenting some of his best tunes from their releases. A West Coast-based performer who has proven himself equally capable in jump, swing, and rockin’ blues genres, he makes an afternoon appearance at Tower Records, followed by an evening performance at Congo Square.

—R.W.

Mercator If you haven’t yet seen Mercator, you’ve missed a deft and tuneful instrumental band that may take inspiration from indie stalwarts like Slint and Tortoise, but play with the melodic sense of Built to Spill and Boston. It’s rock that isn’t pretentious. Mercator are joined at Murfreesboro’s Red Rose Coffee House by Chapel Hill’s The Scaries and Minneapolis’s Motion City Soundtrack.

Moe Loughran/Starch Martins Fiery rocker Loughran performs songs from her new LP The Tulip Tree at 12th & Porter. Get there early for opening act the Starch Martins, whose jangly Midwestern pop should please fans of The Jayhawks and Blue Rodeo.

Friday, 5th

Flotsam & Jetsam This veteran Arizona thrash-metal quintet storm 328 Performance Hall. Best known for being the first band to employ former Metallica bassist Jason Newsted, Flotsam & Jetsam have stayed the course through the narrow but relevant shifts in their core metal constituency. They’ve added elements of techno as a nod to modernity, but have mostly spent their 15-plus years indulging in more screech than grind, and exploring more eclectic lyrical subject matter than their death-and-destruction-minded brothers.

—N.M.

Hayseed Dixie The cheapest gimmick in pop music is for a band of one genre to cover songs by artists in a seemingly opposite genre. When the stunt works, it can be mindless fun (Big Daddy, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes), or it can be revelatory (Mark Kozelek, Tori Amos). It can also be a thudding half-joke of Dread Zeppelin proportions, which is the case with these opportunistic bluegrass players; they’ve recorded an entire album of AC/DC covers with little attempt to thoughtfully interpret either the band they’re exploiting or their own musical tradition. It might be good for a grin to see Hayseed Dixie when they play the Exit/In, but expect that smile to lock up when it becomes clear that this joke only has one punch line.

—N.M.

The Hoptown Tigers The scheduled headliner at The End, the NYC-based Toilet Boys, canceled their 18-city tour in the wake of the WTC bombing. (The band’s gear was reportedly stuck in storage in Lower Manhattan.) In their place, the venue offers the Hoptown Tigers and their pyrotechnic punkabilly. Sideshow Bennie opens.

Saturday, 6th

(Smog) Indie minimalist Bill Callahan has added parentheses around the name of his deep, dark lo-fi folk project, for reasons that are as obscure as his music itself often is. Whatever the typography, (Smog)’s latest LP, Rain on Lens, remains essential listening for devotees of the rock ’n’ roll underground. Callahan has long since honed his method—mellow, Velvet Underground-y drones wrapped in swirling strings, dyspeptic guitar noise, and fractured, personal poetry—and what varies from record to record is the mood and how generous the bandleader chooses to be with his hooks. Rain on Lens is no Knock Knock or Red Apple Falls, but it’s still fascinating in its monochromaticism. Expect hypnotic, circular melodies and intense performances when the latest incarnation of (Smog) plays The End. Neil Michael Hagerty opens (see below).

—N.M.

Neil Michael Hagerty For almost two decades, Hagerty has been a consistent thread in the lineage of sons-of-“Sister Ray” fire music. His seminal work with Pussy Galore and Royal Trux (whose sprawling, lysergic collage Twin Infinitives stands as a milestone ’90s album) demonstrates a mastery of classic rock forms, yet never comes across as clichéd or insincere. His recently released solo album is a great and ambitious one, layering trippy, reverb-soaked blues lines over electronica-inspired drum tracks one minute and organ-fueled Appalachian R&B the next. His appearance at The End with (Smog) should be a good one, and there’s the possibility of an onstage collaboration along the lines of (Smog) and Hagerty’s recent album with Edith Frost, Tramps, Traitors and Little Devils. Show time is 9 p.m.

—C.D.

The 28s Which berry has the strongest juice? Chuck Berry, of course, and the proof’s in The Great Twenty-Eight, the hits collection that gives this all-star Berry tribute band its name. These infrequent Berry tributes are perennial crowd-pleasers at 12th & Porter, but this one is special for several reasons. For one, this marks the first time in years that all the rotating players—Dan Baird, Jack Irwin, Doug Lancio, Brent Little, Tommy Meyer, and E Street Band bassist Garry Tallent—have been in town at the same time. For another, the group has found a novel way to benefit New York’s Fire Fighters 9-11 Relief Fund. For the right price, the players will turn themselves into one lean, mean karaoke machine, and you can take the lead vocals on any Berry song you like. All that duck-walking in front of the mirror may finally pay off. To register your song and donation, contact Irwin at 385-3963 or jackirwin@mindspring.com. Who says you have no particular place to go?

—J.R.

Eric Nordhoff This pianist may not be very familiar to Nashville fans, but he may shortly gain more recognition with the recent release of his album Reflective Piano: Quietude, one of the first four dates issued on the new local label Ambience. Nordhoff’s LP largely offers an ambient, mellow sound, but he displays more energy and fire during his live performances. He’ll be performing a solo piano date Saturday afternoon as the latest local artist featured in the Jazz@Bellevue Center performance series.

—R.W.

Sunday, 7th

Alison Krauss & Union Station featuring Ron Block Bluegrass’ reigning crossover queen went and got democratic on us on her shimmering new album, giving band members Ron Block and Dan Tyminski a couple turns each at the mic. Not a bad move, given the success of the latter’s rendition of “Man of Constant Sorrow” in O Brother, Where Art Thou? or that the former has a new album out. That egalitarian spirit, plus an embarrassment of first-rate harmonies and picking, should be in effect when Krauss and company return to the Ryman Auditorium.

—B.F.W.

Randall Bramblett This Georgia-born recluse played with Gregg Allman and Sea Level and put out a pair of solo albums in the ’70s, but few heard his heady stew of jazz, R&B, and country-rock till the release of his fourth solo project, No More Mr. Lucky, earlier this year. Fans of thoughtful eclecticism—indeed, music so utterly internalized that it doesn’t sound eclectic at all—won’t want to miss Bramblett and his band when they play at 3rd & Lindsley.

—B.F.W.

Hakim Rahsul & Company Saxophonist Rahsul leads a jazz trio on everything from Ellington standards to contemporary chart-toppers, 5:30-7:30 p.m. every Sunday at Jefferson Street Cafe, 1022 Jefferson St. Call 320-0048 for information.

Tuesday, 9th

The Jim Hoke Nonet/Jazz Workshop If you bemoan Music City’s dearth of live jazz, you have no excuse for not checking this out. In the spirit of Charles Mingus’ public rehearsal-band experiments, saxophonist and hard-bop bandleader Jim Hoke has started a club residency every other Tuesday at Bean Central on West End that doubles as a rehearsal and shaping of new material. What does this mean for you, the listener? Hot, loose jazz with lots of sit-in guests and surprises—and it’s absolutely free. The lineup features Randy Leago on tenor sax; Jack Silverman on guitar; Charlie Chadwick on bass; Bob Mater on drums; Kevin Madill on keys; Doug Moffett on baritone sax; Bill Huber on trombone; and Steve Herrman on trumpet. Come for the lattés, stay for the solos.

—J.R.

Tuesday, 9th-Wednesday, 10th

Rag Man Son Revue Fresh from his sterling rendition of Nelly Furtado’s “I’m Like a Bird” at last week’s “Guilty Pleasures” Red Cross benefit, singer-songwriter Angelo returns to the Slow Bar with a full band and better material—his own.

Wednesday, 10th

Neko Case and Her Boyfriends An August performance at the Opry Plaza pretty much summed up the alluring duality of this Chicago-based chanteuse: Recalling country legends left behind in today’s Clear Channel stranglehold, Case reinjected a powerful dose of authenticity into the hallowed grounds with her twangy torch songs. But before the hot and humid night was through, her rebellious side—forged in the Northwest punk scene—surfaced with an impromptu removal of her T-shirt, which left the gathered crowd eyeing more of Case than Playboy has seen. (The redheaded firebrand reportedly turned down an offer to pose for Playboy.com, holding out for the print version.) Conditions might not be quite as muggy when she returns to Nashville this week, but it’s a safe bet that the heat index inside 12th & Porter will be anything but mild.

—D.R.B.

Reckless Kelly Like many young country-rockers, this solid, Austin-based combo have been gradually shedding much of the first half of their hyphenated genre, emphasizing their latent power-pop side instead. But Reckless Kelly are more country than most of their generation, particularly on the slower numbers, where they embrace the twang. And even the band’s uptempo, jangly songs don’t completely obscure their honky-tonk roots. Heck, they’ll probably be boot-scootin’ when they play the Exit/In.

—N.M.

Lifehouse Those keenly attuned few who can distinguish these earnest mid-tempo rock balladeers from Train, Staind, Creed, The Verve Pipe, or Incubus will probably be excited to note that they’re playing at 328 Performance Hall with the similarly indistinct (but as yet less famous) The Calling.

Film

/“Out and About” Here’s a recipe for modern romance: a young gay man, an aspiring musician, and hundreds of guys dressed up as Stevie Nicks. That’s the formula in Gypsy ’83, an independent feature by director Todd Stephens about a cross-country odyssey leading to New York’s annual Night of 1,000 Stevies. (Stephens’ previous film was called Edge of Seventeen, so we’re guessing the guy’s worn out more than one copy of Bella Donna.) The film is the centerpiece of “Out and About,” an evening of queer cinema sponsored by the Nashville Independent Film Festival and the Human Rights Campaign in honor of National Coming Out Day. Additional shorts include “Home for Christmas” and the knockout puppetoon “The Old Man and the Goblins.” The host is John Bridges, best-selling author, Metro arts czar, and raconteur; the festivities begin 7 p.m. next Wednesday at Regal’s Green Hills megaplex. For more information, call 742-2500.

—J.R.

Apocalypse Now Redux Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam retelling of Heart of Darkness returns to theaters with an extra 53 minutes of restored footage, including the legendary plantation sequence. The new cut (supervised by Coppola’s brilliant editor, Walter Murch) is said to reflect the director’s original intentions, since the version that played theaters in 1979 was hurriedly assembled to meet a release schedule. Restored to Technicolor lushness, the movie opens Friday at Green Hills, which also starts the oddball karaoke comedy-drama Jackpot. See our Film Listings and Movie Clock on p. 60 for more information.

—J.R.

Lolita Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 film isn’t a tragicomic jewel, like Vladimir Nabokov’s novel, but its daring, ice-cold humor is a vast improvement over the gauzy shampoo-commercial lyricism of the Adrian Lyne version. Above all, it has James Mason as an archly farcical Humbert Humbert and Peter Sellers riffing like mad as the diabolical Quilty. The movie screens Saturday and Sunday afternoon at the Belcourt, kicking off a month of Kubrick matinees that includes Paths of Glory, Full Metal Jacket, and A Clockwork Orange.

—J.R.

The Man Who Bought Mustique If he didn’t already exist, Monty Python or Evelyn Waugh would have had to invent Colin Tennant—an upper-crust British twit with a streak of entitlement as wide as the Thames. Tennant, friend of royalty and former jet-setter, once owned the Caribbean isle of Mustique, and he commands this amusing documentary by treating the island’s millionaires, its native help, and ultimately the filmmakers with blithe contempt. And there’s vicious fun to be had in the spectacle of Tennant’s rampaging ego. The film opens Friday at the Belcourt.

—J.R.

Black Sunday Halloween arrives early at the Watkins Film School via this atmospheric 1960 shocker, the unmistakable work of Italian horror maestro Mario Bava. Barbara Steele became an international scream queen playing a revived 200-year-old witch and her intended victim, a 19th-century princess. The classic chiller gets a screening on video Friday night at Watkins; it’s free and open to the public.

—J.R.

Training Day His first day on the job, rookie cop Ethan Hawke learns the stuff they don’t teach you in police academy—for good reason—from dangerously burned-out partner Denzel Washington. We’ve been waiting to see Washington play a bad guy for years, and advance word is that neither he nor the movie disappoints. The film starts Friday. Also opening: John Dahl’s interstate thriller Joy Ride, with Paul Walker and Leelee Sobieski; the romantic comedy Serendipity, with John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale; and the Disney comedy Max Keeble’s Big Move.

—J.R.

Adanggaman Roger Gnoan M’Bala’s powerful drama examines Africa’s own role in the 17th-century slave trade, following a young tribesman’s attempts to liberate his captured mother from an Ivory Coast despot before she’s sold to British slave traders. A gripping film as well as a slice of ignoble history, the movie shows for one more week at the Belcourt; it is strongly recommended.

—J.R.

DVD/Video

/Godmonster of Indian Flats Yes, Psychotronic fans, it’s Christmas in October. The work of two obscure Z-movie auteurs gets the royal treatment from Something Weird/Image, which has devoted fabulous DVD packages to some truly crappy movies. The Death Curse of Tartu disc features two bizarre low-budget shockers from Florida director William Grefe, including his 1966 half-man/half-jellyfish opus, Sting of Death. Fredric Dobbs, meanwhile, receives recognition as the maker of 1973’s Godmonster of Indian Flats, an unforgettably loony allegory about racism, greed, and an eight-foot mutant sheep on a rampage. Both packages come loaded with drive-in trailers, exploitation art, bonus shorts and features, and radio spots—the Grefe disc even has commentary! Either one will make your new two-disc Citizen Kane package sparkle all the brighter.

—J.R.

Boogeymen A month ago, a FlixMix DVD compilation of nothing but the murder scenes from classic horror films seemed like a reasonable idea. After all, what is DVD for if not subverting conventional narrative modes and getting straight to the good stuff? On the other hand, is the “good stuff” in Halloween and A Nightmare on Elm Street really just the violence, or is it the anticipation of violence? And no matter which it is, does anybody really want to watch two context-less hours of people being hacked to death right now? Even with a commentary track by Robert Englund?

—N.M.

Dance

“Reunions”/“The Bell Witch”/“Harvest Home Suite” Nashville Ballet opens its 16th season in collaboration with the Nashville Chamber Orchestra, offering a program that explores Tennessee folklore and familial relationships and features the music of Music Row veterans Gretchen Peters and Beth Nielsen Chapman; “The Bell Witch,” a ghost story with music by Conni Ellisor; and “Harvest Home Suite,” music by Jay Ungar and Molly Mason. The orchestra will also perform Béla Bartók’s Divertimento for Strings, without dancers. Oct. 5-6 at TPAC’s Polk Theater. See the story on p. 33.

—M.B.

Theater

Dracula Sure, it’s appropriate as a Halloween piece, but this timeless tale of the bloodsucking count and his mesmerizing personality intrigues audiences any time of year. Circle Players offers a new production of Bram Stoker’s classic vampire story, opening Oct. 5 at TPAC’s Johnson Theater. Nashville’s oldest community theater will keep the deadly count in his element through Oct. 28, just in time for kinder, gentler Halloween activities.

—M.B.

No Exit Quite frankly, it’s impossible to know what the quality of performance will be in this debut production by a brand-new Nashville theater company. Glow Log Productions seeks to successfully resurrect older classics with an edgy message for the new century. They’ve selected Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist vision of hell for their first offering, and indeed, after the World Trade Center attacks, maybe it behooves us to pay attention. No Exit opens this weekend at the Darkhorse Theater, with a cast that includes Mark Islam, Stephanie Scott, Sharon Collins, and Tony Domenico.

—M.B.

Unforgettable Nat “King” Cole is a musical icon. A gifted jazz pianist with a singing voice as distinctive as Sinatra’s, Cole broke important ground for African Americans in the entertainment industry, while also suffering unjust criticism that he was a sell-out to white power-brokers. Yet his song stylings—“Mona Lisa,” “Unforgettable,” etc.—will live forever, as will the legacy that he left to American popular culture. Monroe Kent III is the star of this touring tribute to Cole, which has already played successfully in the U.K. and the Far East, and has been acclaimed by National Public Radio. The musical biography, written by Clarke Peters, comes to Dickson’s Renaissance Center for one show only, Oct. 5 at 7 p.m.

—M.B.

Art

Bongo Java Roasting Company—East You may not know Dave Pfister’s name, but odds are you’ve seen his graphic designs, created for advertising campaigns while working for Nashville ad firms like Reuben Smith and Harmon & Crook over the past 25 years. Like many commercial artists, Pfister is also a talented fine artist, favoring the difficult medium of watercolor. Earlier this year, the artist was diagnosed with throat cancer, and though surgery to remove his voice box saved his life, his medical bills are mounting. Hence, “Dave’s Night Out,” a benefit sale—and first ever public exhibition—of Pfister’s paintings on Oct. 6. Proceeds will help offset medical bills and raise money for further surgery needed to enable Pfister to speak again. The benefit begins with a private show and reception for serious art buyers, 7-9 p.m. A public show and party with musical entertainment follows, 9-11 p.m.

—A.W.

Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art Existing photos of the late William Edmondson’s sculpture-strewn yard in the 1930s suggest the self-taught artist was creating installation art before there even was such a thing. So it seems quite logical for local artist Terry Adkins to use Edmondson’s sculptures as a jumping-off point for his own contemporary installation at Cheekwood, which owns the largest collection of Edmondson’s works in the country. Specifically, Adkins incorporates Edmondson’s “Critter” and “Eve” sculptures with his own limestone works and other elements, including photographs in the Temporary Contemporary space. In the adjacent Installation Gallery, six new media artists incorporate Webcasts, video, and kinetic sculpture into individual installations that explore ideas ranging from death and rebirth to reality TV and masculinity. Celebrate the dual opening at a reception for both shows, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5. Can’t make the opening? Visit Cheekwood on Oct. 7, when the museum and gardens will be open to the public free of charge in honor of the police, firefighters, and the military. Donations of any amount will be accepted for the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund in recognition of those who gave their lives for their country on Sept. 11.

—A.W.

The Gallery at Belcourt The Belcourt Theatre adds visual art to its mix of art films, classic cinema, theater, and music. The opening act for the art space is local artist Ann Tiley, a self-described street artist who creates paintings of such Nashville landmarks as the Union Station Shed, Downtown Presbyterian Church, and the Belcourt itself. Join the artist for the opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5; Tiley’s nostalgic views of a Nashville that is fading fast are on view through Nov. 1.

—A.W.

Books

Sonny Barger If the name Sonny Barger rings a bell, you probably saw last year’s 30th anniversary screening of the digitally remastered Gimme Shelter. The 1970 Maysles brothers documentary, which follows The Rolling Stones from triumphs in Madison Square Garden and Muscle Shoals, Ala., to the terrifying debacle of Altamont, introduces us to Barger in one of the initial sequences that focuses on a call-in San Francisco radio show. Barger offers the DJ his account of what happened at the Altamont Speedway and a general excoriation of Mick Jagger, closing with a highly emotional description of a man’s relationship with his motorcycle. Barger will discuss and sign his new memoir, Hell’s Angel, 6 p.m. Oct. 5 at Davis-Kidd. Bring your own pool cue.

—D.B.

Events

Belmont-Hillsboro Home Tour Trek through 10 homes in one of Nashville’s oldest neighborhoods, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 6. Architectural styles range from classic American foursquares and bungalows to Tudors and Victorians. Some boast faithfully restored interiors, while others have contemporary designs within. This year’s homes are clustered at the south end of the neighborhood to make the walking easier, but there will also be a trolley shuttling folks along the route.

—A.W.

Tennessee Highland Games It’s time for the gathering of the clans at this annual celebration of all things Scottish, Oct. 5-7 at various locations in Murfreesboro. Activities include workshops on climbing your Scottish family tree, sports competitions, Highland dancing, a Scottish music concert, and more.

—A.W.

2001 dB Drag Racing World Finals You’ll tweet until you woof this Saturday and Sunday, as the world’s most deafening car stereos descend on the Nashville Convention Center for a weekend on the precipice of tinnitus. Entertainment includes Predators arena hostesses Ashley and Alexia Counce, Colby from Survivor 2, and a Hawaiian Tropics model search. For more information, try www.dbdragracing.com.

Learning

Ben Page & Charles Birnbaum The Friends of Warner Parks have invited land-scape architects Page and Birnbaum to present a three-lecture symposium on the hot topic of landscape preservation, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 6 at Warner Park Learning Center. Page will talk on the prominent early-20th-century landscape architect Bryant Fleming, who left his mark on Nashville with his design of numerous private estates—including Cheekwood and the stone allée at the foot of Belle Meade Boulevard. “Ten years from now, Bryant Fleming will be a designer name,” says Birnbaum, one of the driving forces in the national landscape preservation movement. As director of the National Park Service’s Historic Landscape Initiative, he’ll present overviews of the emerging field. Reservations are required; call Friends of Warner Parks at 370-8053.

—D.D.W.

Clubs & meetings

Carlton Cornett Halcyon Books in 12 South hosts a meet-and-greet 2 p.m. Saturday for Carlton Cornett, the community activist leading a grassroots challenge to U.S. Rep. Bob Clement in the Democratic primary. Free-jazz saxman Dave Maddox provides the music. For information, call Halcyon Books at 297-5923.

Picks written by Todd Anderson, Diann Blakely, Martin Brady, Douglas R. Brumley, Chris Davis, Donna Dorian Wall, Bill Friskics-Warren, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Angela Wibking, and Ron Wynn.

No Exit Quite frankly, it’s impossible to know what the quality of performance will be in this debut production by a brand-new Nashville theater company. Glow Log Productions seeks to successfully resurrect older classics with an edgy message for the new century. They’ve selected Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist vision of hell for their first offering, and indeed, after the World Trade Center attacks, maybe it behooves us to pay attention. No Exit opens this weekend at the Darkhorse Theater, with a cast that includes Mark Islam, Stephanie Scott, Sharon Collins, and Tony Domenico.

—M.B.

Unforgettable Nat “King” Cole is a musical icon. A gifted jazz pianist with a singing voice as distinctive as Sinatra’s, Cole broke important ground for African Americans in the entertainment industry, while also suffering unjust criticism that he was a sell-out to white power-brokers. Yet his song stylings—“Mona Lisa,” “Unforgettable,” etc.—will live forever, as will the legacy that he left to American popular culture. Monroe Kent III is the star of this touring tribute to Cole, which has already played successfully in the U.K. and the Far East, and has been acclaimed by National Public Radio. The musical biography, written by Clarke Peters, comes to Dickson’s Renaissance Center for one show only, Oct. 5 at 7 p.m.

—M.B.

Art

Bongo Java Roasting Company—East You may not know Dave Pfister’s name, but odds are you’ve seen his graphic designs, created for advertising campaigns while working for Nashville ad firms like Reuben Smith and Harmon & Crook over the past 25 years. Like many commercial artists, Pfister is also a talented fine artist, favoring the difficult medium of watercolor. Earlier this year, the artist was diagnosed with throat cancer, and though surgery to remove his voice box saved his life, his medical bills are mounting. Hence, “Dave’s Night Out,” a benefit sale—and first ever public exhibition—of Pfister’s paintings on Oct. 6. Proceeds will help offset medical bills and raise money for further surgery needed to enable Pfister to speak again. The benefit begins with a private show and reception for serious art buyers, 7-9 p.m. A public show and party with musical entertainment follows, 9-11 p.m.

—A.W.

Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art Existing photos of the late William Edmondson’s sculpture-strewn yard in the 1930s suggest the self-taught artist was creating installation art before there even was such a thing. So it seems quite logical for local artist Terry Adkins to use Edmondson’s sculptures as a jumping-off point for his own contemporary installation at Cheekwood, which owns the largest collection of Edmondson’s works in the country. Specifically, Adkins incorporates Edmondson’s “Critter” and “Eve” sculptures with his own limestone works and other elements, including photographs in the Temporary Contemporary space. In the adjacent Installation Gallery, six new media artists incorporate Webcasts, video, and kinetic sculpture into individual installations that explore ideas ranging from death and rebirth to reality TV and masculinity. Celebrate the dual opening at a reception for both shows, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5. Can’t make the opening? Visit Cheekwood on Oct. 7, when the museum and gardens will be open to the public free of charge in honor of the police, firefighters, and the military. Donations of any amount will be accepted for the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund in recognition of those who gave their lives for their country on Sept. 11.

—A.W.

The Gallery at Belcourt The Belcourt Theatre adds visual art to its mix of art films, classic cinema, theater, and music. The opening act for the art space is local artist Ann Tiley, a self-described street artist who creates paintings of such Nashville landmarks as the Union Station Shed, Downtown Presbyterian Church, and the Belcourt itself. Join the artist for the opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5; Tiley’s nostalgic views of a Nashville that is fading fast are on view through Nov. 1.

—A.W.

Books

Sonny Barger If the name Sonny Barger rings a bell, you probably saw last year’s 30th anniversary screening of the digitally remastered Gimme Shelter. The 1970 Maysles brothers documentary, which follows The Rolling Stones from triumphs in Madison Square Garden and Muscle Shoals, Ala., to the terrifying debacle of Altamont, introduces us to Barger in one of the initial sequences that focuses on a call-in San Francisco radio show. Barger offers the DJ his account of what happened at the Altamont Speedway and a general excoriation of Mick Jagger, closing with a highly emotional description of a man’s relationship with his motorcycle. Barger will discuss and sign his new memoir, Hell’s Angel, 6 p.m. Oct. 5 at Davis-Kidd. Bring your own pool cue.

—D.B.

Events

Belmont-Hillsboro Home Tour Trek through 10 homes in one of Nashville’s oldest neighborhoods, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 6. Architectural styles range from classic American foursquares and bungalows to Tudors and Victorians. Some boast faithfully restored interiors, while others have contemporary designs within. This year’s homes are clustered at the south end of the neighborhood to make the walking easier, but there will also be a trolley shuttling folks along the route.

—A.W.

Tennessee Highland Games It’s time for the gathering of the clans at this annual celebration of all things Scottish, Oct. 5-7 at various locations in Murfreesboro. Activities include workshops on climbing your Scottish family tree, sports competitions, Highland dancing, a Scottish music concert, and more.

—A.W.

2001 dB Drag Racing World Finals You’ll tweet until you woof this Saturday and Sunday, as the world’s most deafening car stereos descend on the Nashville Convention Center for a weekend on the precipice of tinnitus. Entertainment includes Predators arena hostesses Ashley and Alexia Counce, Colby from Survivor 2, and a Hawaiian Tropics model search. For more information, try www.dbdragracing.com.

Learning

Ben Page & Charles Birnbaum The Friends of Warner Parks have invited land-scape architects Page and Birnbaum to present a three-lecture symposium on the hot topic of landscape preservation, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 6 at Warner Park Learning Center. Page will talk on the prominent early-20th-century landscape architect Bryant Fleming, who left his mark on Nashville with his design of numerous private estates—including Cheekwood and the stone allée at the foot of Belle Meade Boulevard. “Ten years from now, Bryant Fleming will be a designer name,” says Birnbaum, one of the driving forces in the national landscape preservation movement. As director of the National Park Service’s Historic Landscape Initiative, he’ll present overviews of the emerging field. Reservations are required; call Friends of Warner Parks at 370-8053.

—D.D.W.

Clubs & meetings

Carlton Cornett Halcyon Books in 12 South hosts a meet-and-greet 2 p.m. Saturday for Carlton Cornett, the community activist leading a grassroots challenge to U.S. Rep. Bob Clement in the Democratic primary. Free-jazz saxman Dave Maddox provides the music. For information, call Halcyon Books at 297-5923.

Picks written by Todd Anderson, Diann Blakely, Martin Brady, Douglas R. Brumley, Chris Davis, Donna Dorian Wall, Bill Friskics-Warren, Noel Murray, Jim Ridley, Angela Wibking, and Ron Wynn.

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