skry1811 
Member since May 2, 2010

Favorite Places

    Offering fresh, casual eat-in or take-away, Zoe's leans heavily on the staple ingredients of Greek food: pita bread, black olives, feta cheese and orzo. The marinated, shredded slaw is strongly flavored with feta cheese, and there’s even a grilled feta cheese sandwich. There’s also lots of poultry on the menu, including Zoe's Famous Greek Chicken Dinner, which includes a whole baked chicken, Greek salad and rice pilaf for $26.95. Be sure to order the delicious fresh-squeezed limeade. Catering services available.
    One of Nashville’s most enduring meat-and-threes, the Pie Wagon originally opened in 1922 in a trolley wagon behind what was then the main post office (now home to the Frist Center for the Visual Arts). In 1979, it moved to 12th Avenue South. Carol Babb bought the business in 1990 and has since built a loyal clientele, recently relocating around the corner to Division Street, where the restaurant continues to serve meat-and-three classics, along with hot chicken on Tuesdays and low-carb selections for the health-conscious. 
    On the one hand, there's no pretense at Paradise, which serves fried Spam sandwiches and MoonPies 24 hours a day in an atmosphere somewhere between NASCAR and Sanford & Son. On the other hand, it's all pretense, from the duct-taped screen doors, which are self-consciously falling apart, to the menu, which facetiously touts a lobster Thermidor that is never actually available. Like country cutup Minnie Pearl, who was really a genteel Southern lady in costume, Paradise's menu of burgers and fries is fresh, high-quality grub in trash-food clothing. The sweet potato fries, feather-light with a nearly candied crunch, rival any in town. Meanwhile, the single-wide with cheese, a juicy third-of-a-pound burger swaddled in a fresh sesame seed bun, slides down like a fast-food grease patty -- in a good way -- but without the scary consistency of moist cardboard. The Shady Acre club sandwich piles on generous layers of Boar's Head meats.
    Corned beef on rye. Whitefish. Latkes. Knishes. Chopped liver. Noodle pudding. Food just like mama used to make, if your mama was Mrs. Lowenstein, or Mrs. Seinfeld. Noshville isn’t just a clever play on words—“nosh” is Yiddish for “eat”—it’s a genuine New York-style delicatessen featuring 6-inch-high sandwiches and classic Jewish comfort food in a casual, cosmopolitan diner setup. Two locations.
    There is nothing little about Maggiano’s, a 15,000-square-foot, 470-seat behemoth that looms over West End Avenue, the largest chain so far to claim a section of that corridor. Owned by Dallas-based Brinker International—the folks who have somehow managed to make a success of the innocuous Chili’s restaurants—Maggiano’s Little Italy feeds big crowds and big appetites from a big, corporate-controlled menu of pastas, chicken, veal and chops, seafood and house specialties, all à la carte. Family-style service is also available for groups, and a private banquet hall seating 152 can fit your entire mob.
    The fajitas are popular here, as is the Gordo, a chicken or beef burrito topped with melted cheese. The margaritas are equally popular, with the most favored being the Cadillac margarita, made with Cuervo Gold and 1800 Grand Marnier.
    When Grins Vegetarian Café opened in Vanderbilt University's Ben Shulman Center for Jewish Life, it was good news for vegans and vegetarians, who have long felt underserved by Nashville's dining options. Grins remains even more specialized by virtue of its kosher kitchen. Six different wraps form the backbone of the menu. Creatively executed soups and side items are made daily. The vegan baked goods, including the popular chocolate chip cookies, are amazing. NOTE: Grins closes during Jewish holidays and revises hours during Vanderbilt student breaks.

    In the Whole Foods Market a horseshoe-shaped bar with seating for about 20, back by the meat counter offers a relaxed and bustling dining experience, with an endless stream of folks walking by with grocery carts. The open plan of the gleaming kitchen affords a view of all the ingredients, athleticism and weird humor that go into a short-order menu of fish and chips, beef short ribs and seared scallops. There is a no-tipping policy. The food is creative, attractive and, frankly, as good as you’ll find in some of Nashville’s infinitely more self-conscious restaurants.


    Back when all Nashville knew of Mexican food was bagged Doritos and Taco Bell, El Palenque invited gringos to their table and introduced them to chicken mole and green enchiladas and tamales. Now that genuine Mexican restaurants, as well as mobile vendors, are nearly as common in Nashville as fried chicken and barbecue, this restaurant has grown rather predictable, catering more to American tastes with huge portions and lots of cheese. Still, it's cheap, full-service, easily accessed in the heart of Green Hills, with bilingual service even a Southerner can comprende. Full bar.
    This exquisite shop owned by chef Brett Corrieri in a vibrantly remodeled bungalow on a side street in 12 South is indeed a cheese shop, but that’s like saying Tiffany’s is a jewelry store. Artisan cheeses thoughtfully selected by Corrieri dominate one of the cases in the front room; ask for a sample and not only will you receive a taste of cheese, you’ll get an education in cheese-making, geography and culture. The same goes for the imported Italian meats. In another case are salads, soups and sandwiches made that morning to enjoy cold or heated in the press; taking the gold medal is the 10K Lire (prosciutto costo, salame toscano, mortadella, copa, sopressata, provolone, mozzarella, spinach and peppadew peppers on a thick slice of focaccia drizzled with balsamic vinegar, olive oil, kosher salt, cracked black pepper and Italian seasonings. The parlor of the house bursts with an inventory of specialty grocery items, dried pastas, jarred goods—all beautifully packaged. In the rear are freezer cases with pastas and prepared entrées. Corrieri’s has quickly become the go-to place for harried hostesses—drop off a platter in the morning, pick up a masterpiece on the way home from the office, party guests will never know. Outdoor seating and a bocce ball court. 
    Boscos
    Once a trailblazer among local brewpubs, Boscos has aged into a sturdy anchor of the Vanderbilt dining corridor. The Hillsboro Village store brews beer on site, which it provides to the newer Cool Springs location. Both stores serve lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch, with a focus on brick-oven pizzas. On Sunday, Boscos jazz brunch shines with a roster of eggs Benedict that includes fried oysters, artichoke hearts, ribeye and crabmeat. — Carrington Fox
    Boscos
    Once a trailblazer among local brewpubs, Boscos has aged into a sturdy anchor of the Vanderbilt dining corridor. The Hillsboro Village store brews beer on site, which it provides to the newer Cool Springs location. Both stores serve lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch, with a focus on brick-oven pizzas. On Sunday, Boscos jazz brunch shines with a roster of eggs Benedict that includes fried oysters, artichoke hearts, ribeye and crabmeat. — Carrington Fox
    In the same location for more than half a century, Bobbie’s is a delightful blast from the past, a favorite family pit stop for hand-patted burgers, fresh-cut fries and soft ice cream treats. The current owners have breathed new life into the old gal, but they’ve retained the old-fashioned charm of the walk-up order windows and the concrete picnic tables. Grilled chicken sandwiches and jumbo beef hot dogs round out the grill menu, and the sweet potato fries are a favorite. A new offering, the Holy Guacamole veggie patty, is sure to please vegetarian customers; it is a spicy black-bean burger piled high with guacamole, jalapenos, tomatoes, onions, cheddar cheese, salsa, and sour cream. Order nachos with or without chili. The classic small cone is perfect for the toddler set; the Kitchen Sink is nearly a gallon of ice cream with everything on it, for $15.95. 
    Batter'd & Fried Boston Seafood House
    East Nashville booster Matt Charette has done a swell job transforming what was a Laundromat and a barbershop into a pub with family-friendly dining that balances the deep-fried bounty of B&F with the fresh school of thought delivered by Wave sushi bar.
 

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