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Comment Archives: Stories: Arts and Culture: Books

Re: “Meet the old Nashville — same as the new Nashville — in a reissue of Paul Hemphill's remarkably prescient book

I was not a country-music fan- and certainly not a Johnny Cash fan- when I viewed the premiere of ABC-TV's "The Johnny Cash Show."

I was drawn to the first episode of what began as a summer replacement series because it was to feature Bob Dylan, in his first TV appearance since his motorcycle accident.

By the end of the show, Dylan was the sizzle and Cash was the steak. I never missed an episode of the Cash show thereafter and knew after seeing the electricity Cash generated within the Ryman Auditorium that I had to know more.

I started listening to WSM Radio through the static (KDWB-Channel 63- was the ROCK station in Minneapolis and it so dominated the dial that my AM transistor radio couldn't always transmit the 650 clear channel frequency).

Somewhere along the way I read Paul Hemphill's book- and then I knew I had to come to Nashville.

Before that happened I began writing for the Upper Midwest Country & Western News-Scene and worked "off the books" at a local country-music FM radio station.

I arrived in Nashville on a hot summer aboard a Greyhound bus prepared to struggle. As I wheeled my carry-on out of the Ernest Tubb Record Shop (there was only one location at the time), my other hand holding a bottled soft drink I purchased for a dime from a vending machine inside the shop), I was stopped by a police officer. He thought I was a runaway.

That was the first of my summer adventures in Nashville. Most of it was everything I imagined from reading Hemphill's book (another great read of that era was John Grissim's earthy Country Music: White Man's Blues)
in its most romantic rendering.

The one disappointment? Music Row. I imagined the heralded district to be streets paved with gold.

Instead, I found small houses converted into studios and publishing companies.

But the people were the friendliest I'd ever known- some were especially kind and selfless- and so I decided to stay, anyway. At that point, that meant only a few weeks.

As soon as I was able, the move became (save for a period I rarely acknowledge) permanent.

Stacy Harris
Publisher/Executive Editor/Media Critic
Stacy's Music Row Report
http://stacyharris.com

Posted by Stacy Harris on 07/22/2015 at 10:00 PM

Re: “Author Charles L. Hughes takes a swing at conventional wisdom about country, soul and race

Are there no acclaimed female authors on Southern soul?

Stacy Harris
Publisher/Executive Editor/Media Critic
Stacy's Music Row Report
http://stacyharris.com

Posted by Stacy Harris on 07/07/2015 at 8:15 PM

Re: “Author Charles L. Hughes takes a swing at conventional wisdom about country, soul and race

Are there no female acclaimed authors on Southern soul?

Stacy Harris
Publisher/Executive Editor/Media Critic
Stacy's Music Row Report
http://stacyharris.com

Posted by Stacy Harris on 07/07/2015 at 8:14 PM

Re: “Author Charles L. Hughes takes a swing at conventional wisdom about country, soul and race

Fascinating interview. MUST read the book.

Posted by Conslor on 06/25/2015 at 5:27 AM

Re: “Addressing the Trail of Tears, NPR's Steve Inskeep proves why the world needs another Andrew Jackson book

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Posted by inezmccormack on 06/10/2015 at 11:49 AM

Re: “Alysia Burton Steele's portraits of long-lived black women in the Mississippi Delta explode contemporary notions of beauty

Dear Alysia Burton Steele, I don't know if you can help me but I am looking for any possible relatives I may have in Corinth or any other city in MS. My grandmothe was Jeanette Burton (Henderson) she passed away in 1971 leaving her only child my dad Anthony T Burton. She was born in 1924 and had my dad @ age 15 in Corinth MS June 1939 but never talked about the father. Therefore I have another family I don't even know about. Could we be related somehow? My name is Gabrielle Burton-Hill. I live in NY.
By the way your pictures are lovely!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by gabrielle burton-hill on 06/07/2015 at 3:36 PM

Re: “Addressing the Trail of Tears, NPR's Steve Inskeep proves why the world needs another Andrew Jackson book

Growing up, as recently as the 1990s, I knew old timers in the modern Cherokee Nation who refused to touch twenty dollar bills because of Andrew Jackson's face upon them. As a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, I hope Mr. Inskeep's work inspires others to learn about our people, although today, it seems every other white American claims our heritage of shared suffering for their own. Such cultural appropriation is very much in the same vein as that which their ancestors did to mine regarding land, and it is similarly as devastating. It is the nature of European American culture to possess that which intrigues it and to exploit that which it is able, often for no other reason than because it can. Family myths of native lineage with no basis in fact fester throughout generations until our traditions, language, and culture are corrupted by the descendants of our former murderers. I truly hope that such education as Mr. Inskeep's foments a need for those with "Cherokee Princesses" in their trees to seek out the truth, rather than continuing to demand acceptance by those of us who remain today, not as an anachronysm, but a proud and vibrant people with a future mirroring the millennia of our past.

Posted by Katahya on 06/06/2015 at 2:14 PM

Re: “With The Painter, acclaimed adventure writer and novelist Peter Heller delivers a soulful page-turner

He already has the potential. I am amazed by his work in writing. Looking forward for him to spread good news about freelance writing to everyone who aspires to be. I know, it is not easy but everyone along with dedication and focus, they will surely succeed. Thanks for sharing this useful article.

Posted by dothy28 on 05/12/2015 at 3:47 AM

Re: “"She terrified people"

Whether ornot a couple/person is gay is not the problem with adoption. it is the "closed" part. I am adopted, although not through the GT society. It took me 40 years to obtain my original birth certificate and my adoption was all within the family of my birth mother. her mother and sister took me from her. The precursor to adoption should be if you can love and financial care for a child with the love and attention required.
We, as a society, will never rid ourselves of predjudice if people don't let it go. I wouldn't care if a gay adopted me, if they raised me to be myself and gave me love and medical care and spent time with me.

Posted by Cdb on 04/26/2015 at 11:15 AM

Re: “Journalist Jon Ronson asks: Is a Twitter pile-on the new stoning in the public square?

Print media had gatekeepers. They were known as editors, and they usually kept out the worst attacks (unless you're thinking about supermarket tabloids). There are no gatekeepers on many websites. Any moronic jerk can write whatever he wants, and it goes out to millions.

Posted by Bob on 04/14/2015 at 7:18 PM

Re: “Journalist Jon Ronson asks: Is a Twitter pile-on the new stoning in the public square?

Bob--Didn't you just skip over the whole history of the print medium as a shaming technology?

Posted by Pete Wilson on 04/14/2015 at 4:00 PM

Re: “Journalist Jon Ronson asks: Is a Twitter pile-on the new stoning in the public square?

Public shaming has existed for centuries, but it used to mainly happen face to face, involving people who knew each other. Now it happens online, and comes from strangers who anonymously (and cowardly) hide behind handles.

Posted by Bob on 04/10/2015 at 6:17 PM

Re: “Nashville author Jason Miller hits paydirt with his black-humored, hardboiled coal-country procedural Down Don't Bother Me

Interesting article... and speaking of Charles Manson, you may also be interested in reading a fascinating new book just published last week... Manson, Sinatra and Me: A Hollywood Party Girl's Memoir and How She Helped Vincent Bugliosi with the Helter Skelter Case...
http://www.amazon.com/Manson-Sinatra-Me-Hollywood-Bugliosi/dp/1771432055

Posted by Paul Rabinovitch on 03/19/2015 at 12:52 PM

Re: “A titanic tornado makes for true-life terror in Kim Cross' gripping What Stands in a Storm

You tube video - .2014 -- PREVENTING A TORNADO TOUCH DOWN .

https://youtu.be/9twvXn-s_pM

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Stacy Mangino on 03/14/2015 at 6:59 PM

Re: “The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins' debut thriller, is an enthralling tour de force

I just finished this book and it, in my opinion, is well executed and suspenseful - with just the right amount of emotion. I loved how the three women were woven together with support characters to reinforce the storyline. I really liked it, and at one point toward the end I couldn't put it down. I envision this as a movie - here is hoping for that.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Melinda on 02/05/2015 at 4:55 PM

Re: “The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins' debut thriller, is an enthralling tour de force

one of the best novel i've read in ages, it truly made my day...rachel was obsessed with jess and jason and i ended up obsessed with this fat rachel...

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jawwad Durrani on 02/05/2015 at 10:37 AM

Re: “In Every Night's a Saturday Night, legendary rock 'n' roll saxophonist Bobby Keys shines a light on the life of a career sideman

He was a lame sax player fer sure - often out of tune with very limited chops

1 like, 4 dislikes
Posted by Df on 12/03/2014 at 1:12 PM

Re: “Andrew Maraniss' Strong Inside is a superb biography of SEC basketball pioneer Perry Wallace

Very interesting piece on Perry Wallace, Reluctant Pioneer.

One would be even more interested in reading the story of Condredge Holloway, the starting quarterback of the Tennessee Volunteers football teams of the early 1970's, and who, coincidentally, was also black. Holloway was as much a so-called 'lonely only' as Wallace ever was or felt at a elite private institution in Nashville, and the former was the public face and identity of Southern collegiate football tradition at a time and place when even a overwhelming power force like Bear Bryant couldn't get the black players that HE wanted on the Crimson Tide.

How did Holloway survive and thrive his time on campus in private life, when he wasn't being cheered and hailed by anonymous thousands on the field on game-day Saturdays?

Another bio, please.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Conslor on 11/14/2014 at 10:02 AM

Re: “"She terrified people"

My grandma was a georgia tann victim she was stolen from her parents and sold to a couple who beat her and raped her. We are still trying to find her biological mothers death record.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Joshua on 11/10/2014 at 2:28 PM

Re: “Southern Festival of Books 2014 starts Friday — and here's your reader's guide

Just to point out that every one of the links listed here is an author interview or review. All are worth checking out. Our great thanks to Margaret Renkl at Chapter16.org, which has a great many more stories, essays and interviews related to the festival.

So ... who are you going to see?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by mr. pink on 10/09/2014 at 9:52 AM

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