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Comment Archives: Stories: Last 7 Days

Re: “Waste Managment: The Skinny on Promo CDs

I skimmed the comments, but didn't cling to every word of each of them, but lost in this discussion (and more specifically, in your post there, "D. Patrick") is the fact that I'd wager that not one of those envelopes there were solicited. Probably all just shit that was mailed to you because your name is on a list that someone bought from a huckster at a music conference. Would it be safe to say that most of the stuff that you actually get around to listening to is stuff that came your way via some degree of buzz, whether it was a friend passing it along or some other more connected fashion than an unsolicited mailing?

i know this is supposed to be about wastefulness and the death of the CD, but i couldn't help but wonder...

Posted by tomhampton on 10/30/2014 at 12:28 AM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

This reminds me. More than a decade ago, my husband was in the hospital, and I questioned a registered nurse about something she was doing with some equipment and something she was about to put into his IV. She did not speak or understand English well enough to answer my question and, worse, did not understand the English instructions on the packages of stuff she was dealing with. I tried to figure it out but got no explanation, so I told her to stop right there, and I went to the nurses' station and requested that the clueless nurse be barred from taking care of my husband.

Since then, I've run into the same thing at another hospital.

Posted by Oh, what could go wrong? on 10/29/2014 at 11:54 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

Grading for learning has two parts really. The part that is true standards based grading and the part that MNPS threw in as policy a la "no grade lower than 50" "you can always retake it."

Grading tests and other assessments according to mastery of standards is a good practice. Ridding the practice of giving "completion grades" is also wise. But the notion that a student, especially one going for a scholars diploma, can be endlessly retested or graded on a schedule of the students' choosing is not helping them be college and career ready. Further, not *grading* practice (homework) further weakens student accountability as the state ramps up teacher accountability for student learning.

Grading for Learning is good in theory, but not surpringly, the bureaucrats threw in a bunch of crap to weaken it.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by txc212 on 10/29/2014 at 11:42 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

"Educational standards are so lowered at this point that ..."

God help us.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by keepingMyHeadLow on 10/29/2014 at 11:32 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

"Grading for learning not only aides in learning the material, it helps kids understand what it actually takes - in study skills and work rate - to get the grade desired."

In the classrooms of the academic magnets, Grading for Learning has the exact opposite outcome. Those kids learn, above all, how to game the system.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by keepingMyHeadLow on 10/29/2014 at 11:29 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

Q: "How many students have been allowed in with Basic or Below Basic skills?"

A: "now common for a student to have year after year of Basic or Below Basic, he just edges up to Proficient which is now sufficient (Advanced is no longer required) to win that lucky prized seat"

Well, that's different from what you started saying. I agree toughening requirements some is in order, but you are still exaggerating that it is "common." Are you privvy to student-level data? That would be the only way to make this assertion. Where are you basing this "year after year" on?

Below basic is quite rare at these 3 schools. And if a student were able to move from below basic up to proficient, "edges up" isn't a good phrase for it.

For seventh grade scores, there are fewer than 10 for each school who don't hit proficient on math and English and then go on to hit it in 8th grade to let them in HF or MLK. So, 3-4%? Common? Meh. Are there more who don't hit grades or TCAP and are NOT allowed to feed to a magnet HS? Yes, though still a significant minority. And with the possible exception of Algebra 2, basic and below scores are extremely (less than 1%) rare at MLK and HF, so if it's "common" they're getting below basic and basic kids, they are definitely moving them up.

Cut scores are too low, agreed. That's the state of TN and has nothing to do with a conspiracy to destroy magnets. In fact, the obsession with minimal skills testing has changed our nation's schools, not just three of them, in profound ways, and not for the better.

Posted by txc212 on 10/29/2014 at 11:25 PM

Re: “Dee Snider Doesn't Think Taylor Swift Should Be Ambassador of New York City

This makes just absolutely no sense at all.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Pete Wilson on 10/29/2014 at 11:09 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

Ah, we get to the truth -- txc212's and keepingMyHeadLow's comments.

And as we look at the numbers (between one-fourth and one-third) of college freshmen who must take remedial courses because their high school diplomas don't indicate anything and these kids just aren't ready for college work, we see that when remedial doesn't work and few students exit to regular college courses, well, the rules are changed and college students are allowed to skip remedial altogether if they want. See Florida.

Educational standards are so lowered at this point that employers need to be ready with their own tests of proficiency, beginning with ability to read and understand English -- lest such deficiencies get people killed and the employers sued. Of course, that doesn't always cover the messes that might happen when dealing with subcontractors and other labor-supply entities. See ValuJet crash in the Florida Everglades.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Oh, what could go wrong? on 10/29/2014 at 11:08 PM

Re: “High-profile exits leave The Tennessean even thinner-staffed than planned

I haven't clicked on a Tennessean article since 2012, after their limp handed Romney endorsement. I adjusted my google news feed to never show articles from the Tennessean or Fox News, ever. I feel like I fixed the internet.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by David Gilmore on 10/29/2014 at 11:02 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

After having observed grading for learning in action, I'd completely disagree. If you see school as some academic survival of the fittest ring of honor, I'd understand how you'd find grading for learning an anathema. If you're interested in the kids actually learning (retaining and understanding) the material covered, you appreciate it. Grading for learning not only aides in learning the material, it helps kids understand what it actually takes - in study skills and work rate - to get the grade desired.

0 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Mark Mays on 10/29/2014 at 10:58 PM

Re: “The Southern Baptists Build Themselves a Giant Loophole, Decline to Step Through It Yet

Stacy Campfield says "Don't say gay!"

Posted by Cryptomys on 10/29/2014 at 10:49 PM

Re: “The Southern Baptists Build Themselves a Giant Loophole, Decline to Step Through It Yet

@Doyle: If life started at a single place, why not two or three? String theory(?) postulates that there are many more dimensions to the universe than what we can normally see, touch, or hear, So what if an event in another dimension let to a crossover to our dimension and that is how man really arrive on Earth? No one knows for certain so one conjecture is as good as another, but I don't believe we're cousins with lichens.

Posted by yoyo moi on 10/29/2014 at 10:48 PM

Re: “High-profile exits leave The Tennessean even thinner-staffed than planned

Well, this explains now why, every other day, there's yet another "People" magazine-type piece on that sickeningly interminable couple ,Keith Urban and Nicole Kidman, in the Music section. Wasn't one of these something about how they're taking their kids to school....I mean, for real?

Posted by glasat on 10/29/2014 at 10:34 PM

Re: “East Nashville's eco-friendly Little Green House

Howdy it's on now (forgive me for shortening your name-this is far more fetching). We hope at the least you are curious and we are perfectly fine with you being critical. We are all veterans of the building industry. We move between critical and cynical daily.

You are correct in that we designed the house with a glass overhead door. Before we consider it a maw, however, let's consider orientation of the house. The house sits on a north/south axis, meaning the houses faces north and the rear of the house has a southern orientation. The garage door is located on the southern exposure. Another piece of the design puzzle is that directly above that maw is a 6' overhang-which is a cantilevered floor above.

So the long winded answer is passive solar. During winter in our hemisphere the sun sits at a lower angle. The door was designed with a high solar heat gain coefficient to allow in the direct sunlight. Furthermore, this sunlight collects on an insulated slab. During summer when the sun sits higher, the garage door is shaded by the overhang above.

While you are very much correct in that the large amount of glazing does reduce the overall net effective value of the insulation system, the net effect on the home's energy use is a positive. Because of the design the house uses the natural warming of the sun. This helps relieve demand on the heating system (in this case a variable speed, variable refrigerant flow, high velocity heat pump). The less the heat pump runs, the less electricity is consumed, the less electricity consumed the less coal that is burned or natural gas that is fracked.

And you are right to be skeptical about LEED and any other certificate program for that matter. These programs, while truly well intentioned, are designed for the lowest common denominator. It's a means to an end or a conversation starter if you will. It is our groups' belief that it's a worthwhile place to begin. While we are proud of what we built we certainly have our own criticisms.

Please let us know of other curiosities you may have. Relating to residential construction that is. Everything else is hit or miss.

Jeff Middlebrooks
Jeff@nashvillehomeenergy.com

Posted by Jeff Middlebrooks on 10/29/2014 at 9:14 PM

Re: “Register Flips, Hasn’t Ruled Out Giving Inglewood Elementary to KIPP

-"... since when did academic magnets allow those with Basic and Below Basic skills to enroll? When mine applied for HF in the 2009 lottery, there was a minimum GPA and/or high achievement on standardized testing. How many students have been allowed in with Basic or Below Basic skills?"

Policy has changed through the years. It is now common for a student to have year after year of Basic or Below Basic, and then the one special qualifying year, he just edges up to Proficient which is now sufficient (Advanced is no longer required) to win that lucky prized seat at the school. And, of course, those Proficient/Advanced rankings are scaled; so one can manage to be "Proficient" with a less than 50% raw score. It has changed the landscape of the academic magnets in profound ways. Add on to that the dreadful Grading For Learning policy (wholly inappropriate for an "academic magnet" student), and what you have are schools being decimated, not obviously, not transparently, but quietly from the inside out.

That minimum GPA ... not hard to manage. There are lots of kids across the district who manage Proficient (even if just barely) TVAAS scores, and bring home A's and B's on their report cards.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by keepingMyHeadLow on 10/29/2014 at 8:47 PM

Re: “The Southern Baptists Build Themselves a Giant Loophole, Decline to Step Through It Yet

actually, yogastray, I do believe that. we are made of the same material as that algae. now the algae or the single cells that made it may have come from space, maybe on a meteor, and landed on earth. in fact, we've had events in the past that likely completely destroyed all life on the planet but cell "seeds" left the earth on fragments, orbited around the solar system and crashed back to earth to re-germinate simple life forms that eventually evolved into me (maybe you too). and monkeys were one step on the way.

Posted by Doyle on 10/29/2014 at 7:54 PM

Re: “Dee Snider Doesn't Think Taylor Swift Should Be Ambassador of New York City

Thing is, Taylor was asked to do this - a pretty flattering offer, right? So she should have turned down the people who asked her out of fear about what other people might have to say about it? That would seem to be a pretty chickenshit thing to do. I've read interviews with TS talking about New York, and she doesn't claim to be an expert. She's very aware that of the fact she's a newbie. Maybe that's what the folks who asked her wanted, and Taylor said "sure, I'd be glad to help market NYC. I love it here." It's understandable to criticize the choice that someone or some board of people made in choosing Taylor Swift to be "an ambassador", whatever that entails. But Taylor just said yes to something that was an offer to her, and one she probably viewed as a challenge. The folks in charge were probably a little more comfortable from a marketing standpoint having Taylor's image out there than Nicki Minaj's. I doubt the video for "Anaconda" would match the image desired for most tourism commercials. I doubt most people want to look at Dee Snider's face any longer than they have to either. Taylor's image is a pretty low risk prospect for marketing lots of things. She's one of the world's biggest stars, she's new to town, she's probably not going to do anything embarrassing, she dresses nice, and looks good in pictures. That's probably how far the decision making process went. If I were picking someone to be an ambassador for NYC, I'd probably pick Derek Jeter - but what do I know? I didn't make that choice. Someone else did. Is Taylor too good for Nashville? I think the answer is, she's too big for Nashville - or at least too big for the constraints of country music. If someone was choosing an ambassador here, it would probably wind up being a bro country dude or a gal with a cowboy hat and thick southern accent. That image doesn't exactly represent me either. Taylor Swift has done pretty well for someone who's just 24 yrs old. She gets called lots of things like bland or boring - but her transformation and growing confidence is pretty cool to watch. I already like her better than most if not all of the top 40 music queens, and she hasn't been doing the top 40 thing very long.

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by zoeydeathpanel on 10/29/2014 at 7:08 PM

Re: “Dee Snider Doesn't Think Taylor Swift Should Be Ambassador of New York City

I wish she had donated the money to the Nashville school system but she should live where she wants to. Who is Dee Snider?

1 like, 3 dislikes
Posted by Peggy on 10/29/2014 at 5:59 PM

Re: “Chicago’s Doughnut Vault Headed to the Gulch

That's a long time to wait, but the doughnuts are off the chain there, so there's that.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by fancycwabs on 10/29/2014 at 5:31 PM

Re: “Tennessee Ranks Near the Top in Felony Disenfranchisement

44, that shows just how little you know. If you kept up with contemporary political thought you might be surprised about a lot of things.

Long, harsh sentencing was a bipartisan effort and needs to be changed.

Life for beating your wife seems a little overboard.

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by john on 10/29/2014 at 5:29 PM

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