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Comment Archives: Stories: Music: Features: Last 30 Days

Re: “While Sir Richard Bishop's guitar violently bleeds, the rest of the world catches up

Doors are at 7. Show starts at 8. Two openers. Approx 30 minute sets for each with small transition time in between, then SRB will play. Definitely a kid friendly space.

Posted by Tate Eskew on 08/28/2014 at 3:29 PM

Re: “While Sir Richard Bishop's guitar violently bleeds, the rest of the world catches up

I noticed there are two other playing with. I assume they are opening for him?

Trying to gage the time so I can bring the kids.

Posted by 44allin on 08/28/2014 at 11:21 AM

Re: “While Sir Richard Bishop's guitar violently bleeds, the rest of the world catches up

For those interested. The show is on Sunday, the 31st, at the Emma Bistro. 11 Lea Avenue, Nashville.

Here is the Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/6041838830…

You can buy tickets here: http://fmrlarts.org

You can read about the artists playing here: http://fmrlarts.org/2014/08/27/fmrl-presen…

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tate Eskew on 08/28/2014 at 10:19 AM

Re: “Paramore broke the Nashville Curse and never looked back

I don't get this. I'm from Philadelphia, where Jason and the Scorchers received tons of airplay on the AOR stations in the early '80s, enough that I know who Jason Ringenberg is. How is this a curse?

Posted by Tim Delaney on 08/26/2014 at 9:22 PM

Re: “Roving electronic dance music fest Mad Decent Block Party shines a light on Nashville's EDM culture

Emd sucks ! Trance rocks !

http://psytranceportal.com/
http://mesibatube.com/
www.nightout.co.il

Posted by Jenny Tegar on 08/25/2014 at 8:34 PM
Posted by OLDoldcrow on 08/21/2014 at 3:20 PM
Posted by Giles Lloyd on 08/21/2014 at 7:42 AM

Re: “Every generation throws a boy band up the pop charts — and One Direction, it's your turn

"Every generation throws a boy band up the pop charts.'

Not prior to The Beatles. The Four Freshmen, The Four Seasons, The Four Tops, The Dovells, The Temptations and The Kingston Trio weren't exactly boy bands. And as exciting as The Beach Boys were, I don't think the girls who screamed for them necessarily even knew them by name.

Stacy Harris
Publisher/Executive Editor/Media Critic
Stacy's Music Row Report
http://stacyharris.com

Posted by stacyharris on 08/19/2014 at 8:23 PM

Re: “The post-apocalyptic return of songwriter Vernon Rust

Glad you're doing good & am very proud of you!
Dartha @ 4065957581

Posted by coonassdartha on 08/11/2014 at 9:26 PM

Re: “Rodrigo y Gabriela's stripped-down 9 Dead Alive still bursts with energy

What an honor for Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz to be included in your selection of heroes. There has truly been a renaissance in interest in this brilliant woman, this poet, this philosopher, this writer, this instigator of truth. (see http://lavenderpoems.com/sor-juana-ines-de-la-cruz-poems/ ). Were she alive, I don't doubt that she would be proud to have a selection dedicated to her. From all of us who adore her, thank you.

Posted by LavenderPoet on 08/11/2014 at 4:37 PM

Re: “A musician of impeccable taste, Lyle Lovett still manages to excite the emotions

Pete, I think Sinatra's later work may have been a little less acute re the selection process: "Watertown" is a bit strange. "High Hopes" is a bit off. But you are right--Sinatra is a great example of a singer who transforms material in pretty much an ideal way. He found what was maybe latent in the material he chose, brought out things that other singers would not have. He applies his taste to material, but it is indeed almost always great material. I'm a student of the way pop singers can counter the unnecessary reverence I often hear in "straight" versions of songs. Manfred Mann doing a detached rock version of John Prine's "Pretty Good" comes to mind, Pete. Yes doing a tongue-in-cheek version of Paul Simon's "America" that almost makes you think that they don't really believe in what the song is saying at all; they just want to comment on the associations the song brings to mind. Rotary Connection's many completely detached and formalist renderings of tunes by Hendrix and the Band and, the best of all, the Rolling Stones' "Salt of the Earth," which they turn into an exercise in...a certain kind of taste. Anyone recasting a country tune in a rock style or a rock tune in a country style seems to be doing something along the lines of what I try to explain.

Posted by edd on 08/11/2014 at 2:15 PM

Re: “A musician of impeccable taste, Lyle Lovett still manages to excite the emotions

That's a good explanation. I certainly do place a lot of value on the quality or capability you're talking about. I think I'd always thought of "taste" as a broader and fuzzier concept, but what you describe does seem like the essence of taste in a context of choosing and performing material. I must object that there was nothing wrong with most of the material Sinatra chose, at least after he gained some autonomy. Banal material is more likely to come from a singer-songwriter than a professional songwriting specialist of the level Sinatra engaged with.

Posted by Pete Wilson on 08/11/2014 at 1:30 PM

Re: “A musician of impeccable taste, Lyle Lovett still manages to excite the emotions

Pete, I define "taste" in popular music to mean something akin to "sensibility" or "cultural awareness." Carl Wilson writes about Dion as a musician who doesn't have any "taste" or who transcends notions of taste, sensibility or cultural awareness. A singer who takes the time to cover a Chuck Berry song in a way that brings the taste of that singer to a tune that meant one thing in 1956 but another in 2014 is deploying his taste in material and his sensibility re what that material means in a cultural context. Whereas Celine Dion is simply a vocalist who hits high notes and displays technical prowess without delving into the meaning of her songs. It takes taste to do effective recastings of others' material. Sinatra employed his taste in songs to recast the material he sang in his own style, so taste also means the ability to stylize material that may have seemed banal or unworthy of attention. This is certainly the case with someone like Snooks Eaglin or Elvis Presley or Alex Chilton, the latter's later career being a prime example of a singer whose taste dictates his choices in material that ranges from the banal to the naive to the just plain strange. Whereas Dion relies on her technique, not her awareness of what the songs may or may not mean or of the distance between an artist's intentions and what he or she actually is able to do. Linda Ronstadt is another good example--famously, she sang Randy Newman's "Sail Away" without seeming to be aware that the song was about slavery, whereas Lovett or Chilton would have known what the song was about and would have turned it into an example of their *taste* in material. The piece is really about the difference between interpreters who use their heads and singers who just use their voices.

Posted by edd on 08/10/2014 at 2:07 PM

Re: “A musician of impeccable taste, Lyle Lovett still manages to excite the emotions

Edd, I'm interested in your definition of "taste" in relation to popular music, not specifically Lyle Lovett. What does it mean?

Posted by Pete Wilson on 08/10/2014 at 1:31 PM

Re: “It's OK not to have an opinion about Miley Cyrus

Will have to send this to my very-non-pop-music late 20's kids. The day after her Robin Thicke twerking performance my son asked, "what's a Miley and why is everyone mad at it?" I'd say he's Miley neutral.

Posted by Linda Allen on 08/09/2014 at 5:43 PM
Posted by M.O.D. on 08/08/2014 at 10:56 AM

Re: “The tale of Ethan Rose, his lathe and his DIY label, Funky Frankenstein

excuse me, what exactly do you do, child?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Das Palms on 08/07/2014 at 9:24 PM

Re: “The tale of Ethan Rose, his lathe and his DIY label, Funky Frankenstein

^ and what exactly do you do?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Das Palms on 08/07/2014 at 9:22 PM

Re: “After 10 years, the Night Train to Nashville keeps rollin'

Whether or not the comment was tasteful, I think the irony was pretty obvious.

Posted by Pete Wilson on 08/04/2014 at 6:33 PM

Re: “Twenty-five years later, host/saxophonist David Sanborn looks back on NBC's Sunday Night

Such a great show. Wish we had something like this now....

Posted by Adi on 07/31/2014 at 3:37 PM

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