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Comment Archives: stories: News: Cover Story

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Great tribute Bruce, you did John proud.

3 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Jim Parker on 07/11/2014 at 4:56 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

A remembrance worthy of the man. Thank you, Bruce.

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Tom Wood on 07/11/2014 at 2:52 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

This is a really interesting conversation, and I want to make two things very clear: 1. My subjects know they are being photographed, and the majority of the photographs published are people who are my FRIENDS. I hang out with them. Regularly. And it is equally offensive to assume that people of different backgrounds and socioeconomic levels aren't friends, assuming I am a "voyeur" or somehow trying to capitalize off of them. I photograph people and things I find interesting and beautiful. This is a small sample of the people and places I photograph. 2. Not all of the people in these photographs would even qualify as "poor" or of a lower socioeconomic level than me!!! Again, big assumption to think that they are! Signing off.

17 likes, 19 dislikes
Posted by Elise Tyler on 07/11/2014 at 12:46 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I like this comment from East Nashville resident about the Scene's readership and the bubble that we're in, for better or worse. It's a sensitive subject, like Elise says, but it's good to hash it out. I'm sure I contribute to it plenty, but I do get uncomfortable with what can look like voyeurism and exploitation. It's fashionable for the middle class artistic community to slum it. Instagram is full of educated people from wealthy families mimicking working class life, or worse yet, #thuglife. Or pictures of poor people who don't know they're being photographed and commented on like they're circus animals. I know that some of that slumming is a statement against consumerism and yuppie crap, which is healthy. But I'm sure it's annoying when people who can afford a night at Husk and Pinewood come in and Columbus a dive bar. Imagine a bunch of loud, bowtie-seersucker yuppies making Stone Fox their regular hang. It could happen, and I'm sure the regulars would turn and glare at them too. Stone Fox is great model for bridging the gap between old and new, and Elise is good at creating an inclusive environment. As for the subject of photography and documenting a neighborhood, I think that anytime a person from a wealthier background - from Dororthea Lange to Instagrammers - attempts to tell the story of someone from another background, there's no such thing as too much sensitivity, self-awareness or humility. If we're going to create/maintain an inclusive community, we've got to check our motives every step of the way. This stuff is hard to talk about, but I hope we keep talking.

23 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Hack Berry on 07/11/2014 at 9:42 AM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

What it comes down to is The Scene does not serve or mean to serve those older residents of off-the-rehab track neighborhoods, and they don't particularly read it. The assumed reader here has some obvious characteristics in education, social class, interests, aspirations and purchasing habits. (The advertisers must hope so, anyway.) If reports on subjects such as these sometimes come off like National Geographic reports on the colorful natives we hope will hang around--in small numbers-- for their colorfulness, assumptions about the assumed audience have something to do with it which shouldn't be denied. On the other hand, given the state of media in this town, where else are change and interactions like those in The Nations going to be documented and discussed--even in comment exchanges like these--at all?

9 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by East Nahsville resident Who's Hoped It Would Remain Integrated on 07/11/2014 at 7:41 AM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I've been in Sylvan Park since the early 1970s .Some of the sweetest kindest
people I've ever known live there and in the Nations. I opened Rhino Books
a decade ago and hope to continue to be a part of the community.
These are pictures of my friends and customers. The young families who shop for children's books give me hope that this community will grow.

17 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by jim parkway on 07/11/2014 at 7:25 AM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

West Nashville has a real historian, Ralph Mitchell.

15 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Westnashomeowner on 07/10/2014 at 11:23 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Also, I still think "Area 51" was the best name the bar location ever had!

6 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Elise Tyler on 07/10/2014 at 9:33 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I'm commenting because these are my neighbors and friends photographed, and it really sucks to hear that people are reading the article negatively. The comment about a "vibe" was comparing an established neighborhood, with long time residents (the Nations) to other neighborhoods that may have more movement of inhabitants- it doesn't matter what economic class a neighborhood is, if the neighbors have grown up together, lived there a long time, or have a sense of community. That's all I meant. And I agree that it would have been great to hear interviews from the subjects! That's why my life has been so enriched by these relationships- because we talk about important things, as neighbors and friends. I took issues to several of my subjects today, and they were excited by the whole thing. I'm sure they would love to talk about what is going on in the Nations! The Stone Fox never planned to be part of the "change"- we don't have big investors, we restored an existing building, and are always working our hardest to pay our 26 employees the most we can afford. We wanted to open a venue, and as life time West Nashvillians, this was the neighborhood we wanted to be in! Change can be hard but also good- that's all I wanted to say in this article. I had no idea it would be the cover, but I'm honored it was. If you have any issues and want to have a conversation, please email me- elise@thestonefoxnashville.com . These are sensitive issues and it deserves a healthy discourse. I have lived all of my 30 years in this city. I want as much as anyone to see it continue to be a diverse, creative city where neighbors know each other and discourse is informative but civil.

29 likes, 10 dislikes
Posted by Elise Tyler on 07/10/2014 at 9:29 PM
Posted by familiar sideman on 07/10/2014 at 9:11 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

For those of you who don't like the piece, or are offended by some essence of it that doesn't fit your desired coverage (all those involved with it complain about the same things you are targeting in this context), maybe you should go hang out at the Stone Fox, where you can see Scottie just about any night of the week. Cynicism isn't cynicism when it's aimed at folks who are already on the same page- it's called not being informed and assuming a lot. There are people of every walk of life and "economic class" that have lived in and around this neighborhood. To whoever is reading this right now, what are YOU doing about our city that is changing so rapidly? Hunkering down and hoping there's something left when the window shifts? Some people actually involve their neighbors. Some people don't just tear something down but actually invest in keeping places and renovating them. Some people care about keeping neighborhoods affordable so everyone- natives or new comers who don't have a ton of $ can contribute to the character of this city. If you really gave a damn about the heart of this city, you wouldn't be so quick to lump people in with all the b.s. development going on by people who have never spent a day of their lives in places like Lynn's Den or D&D, or Grandpa's Too.

18 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by familiar sideman on 07/10/2014 at 7:08 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I cannot believe that the focus of this is entirely on the photographer. Oh, wait, yes I can.

It is genuinely shameful that transportation to the opening wasn't arranged for the subjects of these photographs, and it is even more shameful that nothing in this article about them comes from them directly. I'd much rather hear about them from them.

41 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Brazilla on 07/10/2014 at 6:12 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

"But when poor people can have communities and a neighborhood, it creates a different vibe." So offensive.

34 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by thesearemyneighbors on 07/10/2014 at 5:06 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Please now do a story about the actual people photographed, who might have better insight into the area and what's happening in it.

40 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Maven on 07/10/2014 at 4:05 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Is this a joke? I feel like it's an Onion article with your comparing some Iphone pics of poor people in their yards to depression-era photography. The photos aren't even well-composed.

"But when poor people can have communities and a neighborhood, it creates a different vibe." Puke.

38 likes, 13 dislikes
Posted by Cashville on 07/10/2014 at 3:31 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Gentrifier gains acclaim for photographing a gentrifying neighborhood. How exciting.

34 likes, 11 dislikes
Posted by Anom on 07/10/2014 at 3:13 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

And thus the person whose business is partially responsible for the displacement of an impoverished community of Nashvillians benefits socially and "artistically" off of the appropriation of their images and the flippant re-telling of their tragic stories. Very out of touch, very gross, and, even if well-intentioned, completely exploitative.

53 likes, 14 dislikes
Posted by Cale Donk on 07/10/2014 at 2:28 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Why not host a closing party that includes the photo subjects, with transportation provided? This gentrification conversation could really benefit from the voices of the people affected.

38 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Allison on 07/10/2014 at 1:42 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

This is just annoying all together!

21 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by BelieveinOldNashville on 07/10/2014 at 12:09 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

Worked in a house-turned-law-office in the Germantown area on South 8th Street when I lived in Nashville for three years around the turn of the proverbial current century. Even then, I had a feeling that the neighborhood's proximity to downtown was going to turn it from a scruffy, pretty-in-certain-spots awkward wallflower to a preening hot babe within a measurable matter of time. The belle-o'-the-ball courtin' was already starting right then and there with construction of condos and housing on tear down empty lots about a couple of blocks from the office.

It's all good.

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Conslor on 07/10/2014 at 11:56 AM

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