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Comment Archives: stories: News: Cover Story

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

John was an incredible journalist, a passionate supporter of the First Amendment and a consummate gentleman. With a clever sense of humor. Thank you for this tribute to a man so many admired and respected.

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Sharen Kardon on 07/13/2014 at 2:29 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

As the owner of Hair of the Dog music venue and bistro on 12th avenue S at the start of the development of the 12th South District this sounds all too familiar...locally owned and run businesses provide a wonderful addition to any neighborhood city- the owners are accessible, caring, and knowledgeable citizens who are able to provide a voice to those which would not be heard with a more corporate ownership structure, this bar is no exception. It is a shame that a lot of the community is not aware of this or the fact that these businesses are operating in commercially-zoned buildings which would otherwise be operating with anonymous owners or worse. In my case, the building was abandoned prior to my operation, then made inaccessible to the public immediately after my closure. Kudos to Elise for opening up an old but necessary and relevant conversation for all city residents and their communities. Nashville can always use more friendly businesses and a stage (literally and figuratively) for the public. A work in progress perhaps, but best of luck to the Stone Fox and all the other fantastic small businesses, watering holes, eating establishments, and music venues in Nashville fighting to keep the city's tradition of arts and community alive.
Tracy Crawford

6 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by tracyc on 07/13/2014 at 1:29 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

To me the most hilarious part of the article was the last few lines which talked about why the subjects didn't come to the opening. I doubt it was just "lack of reliable transportation", they probably just didn't want to come to an "art opening" to watch rich white folks gawking at photos of them. The article compared the photographs to the "important photos taken during the depression" which was another completely inaccurate comparison. I doubt that the photos taken during the depression were shown in "galleries" at the time! Sure, as somewhat boring/generic as these photos are, they might have some historic relevance down the line. But as was said in many of the previous comments: the way this "photo exhibit" was done and presented was just exploitive.

8 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by notime forfakethugs on 07/12/2014 at 11:16 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

He was an inspiration. A fighter and go getter. I graduated from MTSU. He made us proud. Passion never dies.

3 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by mgdanford on 07/12/2014 at 4:38 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Right on point. And thanks for that little bit of intrigue!

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Terry Quillen on 07/12/2014 at 1:23 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Beautiful writing, Bruce - - what a wonderful tribute. A couple of years ago, Mr. Seigenthaler called me about some news going on in our neighborhood. I felt like God had dialed me up with a special request. He will be missed by so many.

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Denise on 07/12/2014 at 12:25 PM
Posted by Cynthia Floyd Manley on 07/12/2014 at 12:09 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Bruce, great and wonderful writing. John Seigenthaler was a giant in our community. My fondest memory of him was that he and I were guests on the Teddy Bart radio show on 9/12/2001 the day after the terror attack. He was the most eloquent voice I heard to describe the national mood and feeling of that event. What a wonderful person. He will be greatly missed. David Raybin

4 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by David Raybin on 07/12/2014 at 10:40 AM
Posted by Mark Fraley on 07/12/2014 at 10:31 AM

Re: “From Washington, D.C., to Miami to (gulp) Tennessee, here are the bottom feeders of public office

Obama seeks brisk passage of border children funding bill.
Would subsidize schooling, health care, lawyers for illegal immigrants.
We have to stop this madness. Google this: NUMBERSUSA .
Once you are registered (join us), go to the "action board"

0 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Roger Bradley on 07/12/2014 at 10:26 AM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

"I think one thing that's interesting," she says, "is that in other low-income areas in Nashville, there's a level of fluidity where a lot of people move between different public housing developments."

"Poverty is unavoidable — there's always going to be people who are poor," she says. "But when poor people can have communities and a neighborhood, it creates a different vibe."


What is she talking about??? Is she hanging out at J.C. Napier apartments or James Cayce? No, I didn't think so. Incredibly naive and ignorant statements made by someone who THINKS they feel the plight of others but has no clue.
I am in those areas often because of my job and the sense of community is having to borrow from each other to pay bills or keep an eye out so as to not get shot. Yes, it's a different vibe sweetheart. I'd love to see you immerse yourself in it for a day.

21 likes, 13 dislikes
Posted by James Grau on 07/12/2014 at 8:26 AM
Posted by Lucas Hendrickson on 07/12/2014 at 4:20 AM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I was also raised in the nations, change is hard but can be a good thing. I just wished the houses they were building had some change from one to another. If they keep building the same thing everywhere I am afraid it not going to be very attractive.

12 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Lisa Johnson Tanksley on 07/11/2014 at 11:48 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Beautiful writing, Bruce.

3 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Lisa Anderson Fingeroot on 07/11/2014 at 10:12 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

The fact of the matter is, some of the people portrayed in these photos live richer, more fulfilling lives than many of us young folks that have moved into the neighborhood in recent years. I know one of the families represented in this article and they own many homes in the nations and are hardly struggling financially. I wish this article didn't portay the subjects as poor or impoverished just because they dont live up to Gen Ys standard of living (flashy cars, houses and lots of debt). I know that was not the intent, but that is how it came across in the article. Some folks chose to live outside of what society deems as "mainstream" and that is ok.

15 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by westnashvillian on 07/11/2014 at 10:02 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I was born and raised in the nations and still living here. Its sad to see memories being torn down and rebuilt into properties that dont fit the character of the neighborhood. Its all for the better I guess. (That is for whoever is profiting off of it) This neighborhood being all that ive known I hate to see it change, I hate to see it being replaced. For those of you who dont come from neighborhoods like the Nations you wont understand the way we feel. It is what it is.

9 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Penelope Clardy on 07/11/2014 at 8:23 PM

Re: “Elise Tyler's portraits show a Nashville in the throes of neighborhood transition

I don't even know what this means : " "Poverty is unavoidable — there's always going to be people who are poor," she says. "But when poor people can have communities and a neighborhood, it creates a different vibe."

16 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by westnashomeowner on 07/11/2014 at 6:23 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

He obviously had German roots, David, but his mother, Mary Brew, was I believe the daughter of Irish immigrants. He often referred to himself as being "Irish" in one way or another.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tom Wood on 07/11/2014 at 5:55 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Nice--but wasn't he *German* Catholic?

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by David Carlton on 07/11/2014 at 5:06 PM

Re: “Remembering the late John Seigenthaler, the man who embodied the power of the press

Wow! I was waiting to hear what the Times would say about the man. It can't come close to this.

5 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by noitall on 07/11/2014 at 4:59 PM

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