Thursday, May 24, 2012

Poetry Sucks! (But Nickole Brown and Klyd Watkins Don't)

Posted By on Thu, May 24, 2012 at 7:02 AM

Poetry Sucks! feat. Klyd Watkins, Nickole Brown, William W. Miller and Mark Porkchop Holder
When: Thu., May 24, 8 p.m.
Where: Dino's Bar & Grill, 411 Gallatin Rd.

The sixth installment of the East Side’s grimiest, chillest, most salient poetry series has some serious, if somewhat misleading, connections to the 1970s. For instance: Nickole Brown, who had to cancel a while back, was once editorial assistant to Hunter S. Thompson. But that doesn’t tell you anything about her poetry, which is lyrical and quick (as you'll see in the clip above).

Klyd Watkins’ name might sound familiar — he was part of the quartet whose Poetry Out Loud series of hypnotic, tape echo-saturated recordings were re-released by De Stijl Records earlier this year. But he (probably) won’t be moaning through a delay pedal on this night, though we wouldn’t put it past him. Buttressed with music by Nashville institution Mark “Porkchop” Holder and fiction by Murray State professor William W. Miller, this promises to be another solid, primordially stirred session.

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Mostly Painless: Men in Black 3 Opens Friday

Posted By on Thu, May 24, 2012 at 6:00 AM

Let's set aside the sure-to-be-common question of whether anyone actually wanted another Men in Black sequel in the first place. The answer is, "No, they didn't," but No. 3 is here, and funnily enough, it's mostly painless. Of course, the MIB franchise was never much more than that: painless, and somewhat better for it. For all the gazillions spent on their elaborate CGI effects, the films never really demanded your attention; they were just kind of there, more tolerated than beloved. But in an age when every wannabe tentpole indulges in expansive running times and self-important grabs at seizing the cultural spotlight, the idea of a movie that feels like a breezy afterthought is strangely welcome.

Maybe that's because MIB3 actually manages to capture the playful inconsequentiality of the earlier films. This time out, intergalactic invasion-prevention specialists Agents K (Tommy Lee Jones) and J (Will Smith) are faced with an unspeakably ruthless and powerful being named Boris the Animal (Jemaine Clement). This supervillain breaks out of a prison on the moon and travels back in time to 1969 to kill the younger Agent K (Josh Brolin, doing an uncanny Tommy Lee Jones imitation), preparing Earth to be overrun and devoured by an alien race.

Read the whole review here.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Geena Davis at Lipscomb Tomorrow

Posted By on Wed, May 23, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Geena-Davis.jpg
When:11 a.m. Thursday, May 24
Where: Lipscomb University's Ezell Center

In Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own, a gifted baseball player learns to game a system that allows women in sports only as attractive novelties. That’s a fair description of the career of the actor who plays her: Academy Award winner Geena Davis, who dodged getting typecast as a sex bomb while parlaying a scene-stealing appearance in Tootsie into a string of much-loved films. (A short list would have to include Beetlejuice, Thelma & Louise and David Cronenberg’s harrowing remake of The Fly, and we’d stump for the lesser-known but delightful Quick Change and Earth Girls Are Easy.)

In recent years, she’s turned her attention to how the media shortchange women and girls when it comes to female characters and role models — the subject of a panel 11 a.m. tomorrow at Lipscomb University’s Ezell Center with top-ranking female media executives from here and beyond. Joining Davis will be former FCC commissioner and moderator Deborah Taylor Tate, NPT president/CEO Beth Curley, Nashville Business Journal president/publisher Kate Herman, Tennessean president/publisher Carol Hudler, Young Broadcasting president Deb McDermott, WTVF-Channel 5 president/GM Debbie Turner and WSMV-Channel 4 vice president/GM Doreen Wade; tickets are $100 and available at lipscomb/edu/civicleadership. Proceeds benefit the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and the Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership.

Davis will also host a 20th anniversary screening of A League of Their Own at 2:30 p.m. in Lipscomb’s Shamblin Theatre, but we’ll miss the role model she played in 1996’s cult favorite The Long Kiss Goodnight: a suburban mom-slash-lethal assassin who snaps a reindeer’s neck barehanded. Your move, Sarah Palin.

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Jack White's Triple Decker Print, as Performed by Bryce McCloud

Posted By on Wed, May 23, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Speaking of Bryce McCloud, in case you missed it, here's the video Third Man Records put together of him making the "triple decker" posters for Jack White's recent Ryman shows. Three separate prints, when stacked together, form a composite image thanks to the cut-outs. Ace stuff.

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Go for the Coffee, Stay for the Art: Bryce McCloud's Mural at Barista Parlor

Posted By on Wed, May 23, 2012 at 7:30 AM

There are several reasons to stop by the just-opened fancy-pants coffee shop Barista Parlor (including but not limited to Mast Brothers chocolate, mugs that are the exact perfect size and weight, fantastic light fixtures, and of course, really great coffee), but if you're anything like me, you'll probably make a bee-line to the mural on the shop's back wall, inspect it from close up, gawk at the craftmanship, then back up and gawk at the artfulness of its presentation. It's the latest creation of Nashville printmaker Bryce McCloud, who runs Isle of Printing (for more on that, read this).

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Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Nashville Film Festival Brings on Debra Pinger as Development Director

Posted By on Tue, May 22, 2012 at 2:52 PM

Nicole Kidman at the 2012 Nashville Film Festival
  • Photo: Shelly Justiss/NaFF
  • Nicole Kidman at the 2012 Nashville Film Festival
By all accounts — or at least by the account that counts, that of Scene film czar Jim "I'm Almost Out of Bubblegum" Ridley — the 43rd installment of the Nashville Film Festival was nothing short of stellar, attracting the likes of Nicole Kidman, Famke Janssen and Carrie Preston.

And according to a release sent out today, NaFF has added another key staff member — development director Debra Pringer. Executive director Ted Crockett says Pinger's experience in "helping nonprofits grow" will be key to the festival's ongoing success. Pinger, we are told, "will lead all marketing, communications, and donor-related efforts."

Full release below.

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Thursday: Poetry Sucks! feat. Nickole Brown, Klyd Watkins, Mark "Porkchop" Holder and William W. Miller

Posted By on Tue, May 22, 2012 at 10:40 AM

389637_359227700799284_237612672960788_920745_1820112822_n.jpg
Poetry Sucks!
When: 8 p.m. Thursday, May 24
Where: Dino's

The sixth installment of the East Side’s grimiest, chillest, most salient poetry series has some serious, if somewhat misleading, connections to the 1970s. For instance: Nickole Brown, who had to cancel a while back, was once editorial assistant to Hunter S. Thompson. But that doesn’t tell you anything about her poetry, which is lyrical and quick.

Klyd Watkins’ name might sound familiar — he was part of the quartet whose Poetry Out Loud series of hypnotic, tape echo-saturated recordings were re-released by De Stijl Records earlier this year. But he (probably) won’t be moaning through a delay pedal on this night, though we wouldn’t put it past him. Buttressed with music by Nashville institution Mark “Porkchop” Holder and fiction by Murray State professor William W. Miller, this promises to be another solid, primordially stirred session.

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Lasers, Secret Tunnels and Sombreros: A Field Trip with Artist Christine Rogers

Posted By on Tue, May 22, 2012 at 7:30 AM

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Artist Christine Rogers grew up in Nashville, but she spent the majority of her recent life in Ireland, Boston and New York. She moved back to Nashville about a year ago, only to receive a Fulbright scholarship that enables her to relocate to India for eight months. But just like the phenomenon of never being as southern as you are the moment you leave the South, Christine’s rootlessness inspires themes of family and location-as-home in her art. So I asked her to take me on a field trip, and we toured a laundry list of her favorite spots in search of what it means to be in Nashville. Here’s what we found.

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Monday, May 21, 2012

Emergence at Nashville Ballet, 5/19/2012

Posted By on Mon, May 21, 2012 at 2:27 PM

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“Just keep an open mind,” is what I was told as I took my seat at the Nashville Ballet’s closing production of the season, Emergence. The program challenged audiences and participating artists to stretch their imaginations and step outside of their comfort zones through spontaneous creativity. As CEO and artistic director Paul Vasterling said, “The idea behind Emergence was to be informal, to allow for an exchange.”

The performance was the result of an intensive two-week workshop in which a choreographer, a visual artist and musicians collaborated to produce an original piece. The pieces appeared to blur the lines between dance, music and visual art, resulting in a form of Total Art. With musicians from the Grammy-nominated Alias Chamber Ensemble and artists from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, Nashville Ballet dancers had clearly met their match.

The first piece was inspired by Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wallpaper," and featured choreography by Kelsey Bartman and visual art by Kellie Taylor, set to Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber's “Sonata Representativa.” Bartman and Taylor spoke about the difficulties they faced when they decided to combine that particular narrative to the music. The pre-Bach classical piece was “freer” than most, and Alias artistic director Zeneba Bowers informed us that it was meant to mimic bird calls. Dancers tore paper from a wall installation flooded in uncomfortably optimistic yellow hues as their movements suggested the loss of sanity, while the violins screeched minor-second double-stops in the background.

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John Mellencamp's Art Opening at Tennessee State Museum, 5/17/2012

Posted By on Mon, May 21, 2012 at 7:00 AM

Mellencamp with Fear in America, 2005, mixed media on canvas, two panels, 48 x 156. Photo courtesy of TSM, Denny Adcock, Photographer
  • Mellencamp with "Fear in America," 2005, mixed media on canvas, two panels, 48" x 156". Photo courtesy of TSM, Denny Adcock, Photographer

Last Thursday night I found a spot at my favorite downtown lot and marched across Legislative Plaza on my way to a John Mellencamp press conference and private reception at the Tennessee State Museum. Arriving early for a change, I made my way inside where I was pointed to a media waiting area. Penned-in by lobby furniture, this motley crew huddled like a herd, murmuring among themselves, weighed down with cameras, lights, microphones and the burden of their own expectations of a pop icon who was in town to celebrate his first museum show as a fine artist. I was one among the throng, but not for long.

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