Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Treasured Culinary Possessions

Posted By on Wed, Jan 20, 2010 at 7:25 AM

click to enlarge "That's my great-grandmother's antique. [7UP bottle]. It was passed down to Mary Deil to Gussie Johnson to the great-great-granddaughter, me," says Janice Dunlap, a disabled retired cosmetologist in Waco, Texas.
  • "That's my great-grandmother's antique. [7UP bottle]. It was passed down to Mary Deil to Gussie Johnson to the great-great-granddaughter, me," says Janice Dunlap, a disabled retired cosmetologist in Waco, Texas.

The things that become antiques -- who can guess? These long-neck 7-Up bottles from the 1960s -- my cousin had one and I was so envious. This woman, part of a moving photo essay by Susan Mullally, has saved it through thick and thin, and it's her most treasure possession because (now brace yourself) it belonged to her great-grandmother.

(I know -- I can't do that math either.)

My oldest culinary possession is a handmade wooden sugar bucket owned by my great-great-great-grandmother. The most treasured is a rolling pin my grandfather made from a cherry tree on his farm. It's heavy, and the surface is impossibly silky, so it rolls beautifully. He also made knives, though they were hard to use and the blades dulled quickly. My mother finally replaced them all, but I have his whetstone.

Mezzaluna, fish-shaped bottle opener from Israel, grandma's sugar bowl -- what piece of kitchen gear is firmly attached to your heart?

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